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Amelia can learn from existing business manuals

The sinking feeling of calling a help line and discovering that there’s a robot at the other end may not be as sinky in the future. IPsoft’s "virtual service-desk employee" Amelia is designed to bring advanced artificial intelligence (AI) to help desks and other interactive operations by engaging callers in more intuitive and natural conversations.  Read More

Roccat's Tyon packs in new controls to help you gain the gaming edge

Roccat’s Tyon offers everything you would expect from a wired gaming mouse, including a wealth of customizable buttons and a precision laser sensor. The new peripheral goes a little beyond this however, introducing new controls that the company calls the Dorsal Fin Switch and X-Celerator thumb paddle.  Read More

Windows 10 shrinks Windows 8's Start Screen and moves it to the Start Menu

It’s no secret that Windows 8 was not a particularly successful release, as Microsoft struggled to convince both consumers and businesses of the virtues of its split nature. Fast forward to today, and the company has announced its successor, known as Windows 10. The next version of Microsoft’s operating system makes some big changes, perhaps most notably the removal of the much-hated tile UI.  Read More

Google has announced plans to bring Adobe Creative Cloud services to Chromebooks

Google has announced a partnership with Adobe to bring its Creative Cloud services to the Chrome OS platform. The first product available will be popular image editing software Photoshop, with more programs coming soon.  Read More

An artificial intelligence program created at the University of Gothenburg imitates a chil...

Artificial intelligence programs may already be capable of specialized tasks like flying planes, winning Jeopardy, and giving you a hard time in your favorite video games, but even the most advanced offerings are no smarter than a typical four-year-old child when it comes to broader insights and comprehension. It makes sense, then, that researchers at the University of Gothenburg have developed a program that imitates a child's cognitive development.  Read More

Here's how a few tips on how to keep your data in the cloud private and secure

Whether you like it or not, a lot of your data is probably being stored in the cloud, and that's a trend that's not going to stop. While it is convenient to have your data available from virtually everywhere, it's also prone to security vulnerabilities. Here are some tips on how to keep your cloud-based data private and secure.  Read More

ZEBRA matches keyboard and mouse input with movement data transmitted by an electronic bra...

There are already a variety of technologies for verifying a computer user's identity when they attempt to access sensitive data ... data such as patients' health records on hospital computer systems. The problem is, those users may sometimes forget to log off when they're done, or they may temporarily leave their computer unguarded when leaving their desk. That's why Dartmouth College computer science student Shrirang Mare is developing ZEBRA. It utilizes a sensor-equipped bracelet to continuously authenticate a user's identity.  Read More

HP's new Envy x2 hybrids offer a range of form-factors in one package (Photo: Chris Wood/G...

HP’s new 2-in-1 system takes significant cues from the Surface line, offering a detachable keyboard and adjustable kick stand. That said, the machine is far from a direct clone of Microsoft’s device, packing a few interesting design features of its own, including the ability to mimic All-in-One functionality.  Read More

Toshiba's Chromebook 2 keeps the 13.3-inch display, but ups the resolution to 1080p on the...

Having joined the Chromebook party earlier this year with the first Chromebook to feature a 13-inch HD display, Toshiba has followed it up with its Chromebook 2. On display it IFA, Toshiba's second-generation Chromebook will come in two versions that continue the 13-inch display tradition and bring branded audio to Chromebooks with speakers tuned by Skullcandy.  Read More

The new device incorporates quantum photon polarization to generate random numbers and cre...

With a new device set to make unbreakable, quantum-based cryptographic security available for everyone for the very first time, ordinary people will be able to use cryptographic systems that – until recently – only existed as experiments in the most advanced physics laboratories. Developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) the device incorporates the quantum mechanics of random photon polarization to generate random numbers and create cryptographic keys.  Read More

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