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Hybrids may be the future, says Ferrari CEO

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March 29, 2012

A Ferrari hybrid concept, the 599 HY-KERS, on display at the 2010 Geneva Motor Show

A Ferrari hybrid concept, the 599 HY-KERS, on display at the 2010 Geneva Motor Show

Ferrari CEO Amedeo Felisa appears to have suggested that hybrid technology is ready for commercial rollout. But he hasn't stopped there, hinting at a future in which both hybrid Ferraris and six-cylinder Ferraris may be the rule.

"We will roll out new technology that is there first and foremost to introduce a green factor to our cars and ensure that we can keep our product where it is in terms of CO2," Felisa told the UK's Autocar magazine.

Felisa has previously hinted at a forthcoming hybrid successor to the Enzo, and rumors have circulated of an 800-hp V12 supplemented with a 120-hp KERS system, not dissimilar to the Formula 1-derived KERS system evident in the 599 HY-KERS prototype shown off at the 2010 Geneva Motor Show. And such systems may one day become a Ferrari standard.

"I’m not saying when, but it is possible that this technology will be on all Ferraris," Felisa said. "It has been designed to fit all our future architecture, and if we go ahead it will be fitted as standard."

It's thought that the development safeguards the immediate future of V12 Ferraris, ensuring that environmental targets can be met. But Felisa envisages a future when six-cylinder Ferraris are the norm. "Why not six cylinders?" Felisa rhetorically asked Autocar. “It is far away in the future, perhaps, but it is clear perceptions have altered. ... We have to think in that direction."

Source: Autocar

About the Author
James Holloway James lives in East London where he punctuates endless tea drinking with freelance writing and meteorological angst. Unlocking Every Extend Extra Extreme’s “Master of Extreme” achievement was the fourth proudest moment of his life.   All articles by James Holloway
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5 Comments

"Green factor"... lol

but saving fuel, and consequently CO2, yes sure, GO.... not too fast to avoid over consumption ...

watersworm
30th March, 2012 @ 08:49 am PDT

Hybrid technology may be ready for commercial rollout? Wow, has he ever seen a Toyota Prius?

teeduke
30th March, 2012 @ 09:41 am PDT

He means a commercial rollout FOR THEM. The Prius may be fuel efficient, but it's no Ferrari. The ugly little thing will never be the choice of the kind of person who would want a Ferrari. The Tesla's a bit closer, but there are sexier and sexier high-end electric and hybrid sports cars coming out every day. Ugly little weak cars are no longer the only fuel efficient vehicles out there anymore.

Dave Andrews
30th March, 2012 @ 10:43 am PDT

Hybrids will become so more electric, the more the rising price of oil barrel and the more growing the energy storage capacity of the batteries.

There is no way to contesting the greatest efficiency of electric motors, nor the strong ecological appeal of EV. This will evolute, with the reawakening of the researchs for electricity storage systems, abandoned, since 1900, in favor of easy lucratively, and criminal lassitude of burning oil.

Sergius
30th March, 2012 @ 11:03 am PDT

Burning oil is criminal? It comes out of the ground, it's as natural as you can GET! We're not running out of oil and the day we do none of you will have been alive for a very long time. I'm all for a more efficient way of using energy but just saying something is better doesn't make it so. Being efficient is a matter of convenience (who wants to fill up all the time?) and a logical extension of knowledge and technology but making us use batteries and electric motors is an unnecessary complication. Making a normal IC engine more economical (regardless of displacement or number of cylinders) can be achieved through better fuel management and better mechanical engineering. It never ceases to amaze me how much more cleanly engines burn and how much more usable fuel economy we are getting in just the last 10 years let alone the last 30 years? Let the market decide how and next our automotive future dictates, keep the politics and pseudoscience out of it. All this being said, this is a good effort on Ferrari's part. It will be interesting to see if the market will favor it? :-)

mrhuckfin
8th April, 2012 @ 06:35 pm PDT
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