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— Children

Camatte Vision: Seeing the augmented reality of Toyota Design

By - June 29, 2015 26 Pictures

Within the 2015 Tokyo Toy Show, at the end of June, Toyota displayed the fourth episode in its Camatte series of exploratory concept vehicles. This year’s story was called Hajime (begin) and was a miniature copy of the car design process. It enabled children (and adults) to create their own vehicle concepts on a dedicated tablet and then drive their designs and themselves around a model town, all in augmented reality. Gizmag went along to experience the Camatte Vision for real.

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— Children

Crossbeams lets you design and build your own toys

By - May 8, 2015 29 Pictures

Electrical engineer Charles Sharman noticed several years ago that as they got older, the children he taught at Sunday School tended to migrate from Lego and other building toys to video games. He wanted them to keep creating, so he started a company called Seven:Twelve Engineering and began designing a building toy that could hold the attention of these older kids. That toy is called Crossbeams, and it can be used to design and assemble a huge range of toys – including big, detailed, moving cars and helicopters.

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— Children

OmniO Rider stroller can be worn like a backpack

By - April 8, 2015 9 Pictures
OmniO Rider is a stroller which can be folded down and carried as a backpack, ready to be deployed when your tired toddler suddenly decides they can't walk any more (typically at the point you are farthest from home). The device, which recently won "British Invention of the Year Award" at the Gadget Show Live in Birmingham, UK, is currently looking for funding on Indiegogo. Read More
— Children

Lumo projects an interactive, motion-sensitive game experience onto walls and floors

By - March 31, 2015 13 Pictures
If you've visited a trade show or children's museum lately, chances are you've seen an interactive, motion-sensitive exhibit projected onto a wall or floor. Lumo is the at-home version of this technology, developed by technologists Meghan Athavale and Curtis Wachs who began creating interactive environments for commercial settings. Seeing a demand for a cheaper and more user-friendly version of their product for interactive gaming at home, they're launching an Indiegogo campaign to fund the continued development of Lumo. Read More
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