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New child-resistant spray bottle with double-trigger mechanism

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September 13, 2012

A rendering of the new spray bottle

A rendering of the new spray bottle

The average household contains at least a few spray bottles filled with liquids that ... well, that children shouldn’t be playing with. While most bottles now incorporate nozzles that can be “turned off,” many people don’t bother doing so, plus kids can just turn those nozzles back on themselves. The situation has led to the design of a new type of child-resistant spray bottle that has two triggers.

The prototype bottle was created by researchers at Ohio’s Nationwide Children’s Hospital, working with colleagues from Ohio State University.

“The two-stage trigger mechanism design restricts the ability of young children to trigger spray bottles because they lack the development capability to perform the correct operational sequence and because their hand size and strength are not sufficient to activate the mechanism,” said Ohio State’s Prof. Blaine Lilly. “The spray mechanism is designed to be extremely challenging for young children to operate, yet will allow adults comfortable use.”

Both triggers need to be sequentially engaged, in order to enable the spray mechanism. That mechanism returns to a locked state after each use, which the team claims sets it apart from other systems – according to a study conducted by the hospital that included 25 families with young children, 75 percent of the spray bottles in those families’ homes were left with the nozzles not turned off.

The team is now seeking commercial partners to develop the technology. The prototype can be seen in use in the video below.

Source: Nationwide Children’s Hospital

About the Author
Ben Coxworth An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.   All articles by Ben Coxworth
2 Comments

Just like the grip safety on a Colt 1911A1. How about a shout-out to old John Moses Browning?

Oliver Medvedik
13th September, 2012 @ 07:55 pm PDT

The problem with this is that it only protects truly stupid kids (The ones that evolutionary theory suggests should kill themselves off.) The rest will have no trouble figuring out how to operate it. My parents would always have one of the kids open "child proof" bottles.

The only child proof system that works relies on brute force to stop the child.

Pikeman
13th September, 2012 @ 10:53 pm PDT
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