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Bose In-ear Headphones

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May 6, 2007

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May 7, 2007 In a trend mirrored around the world, US MP3 sales have been rapidly increasing, with a 32% rise in 2006 capping an eight year climb that never fell below the double-digits in percentage gain. And since people (grudgingly) replace headphones far more often then they replace MP3 players, headphone product innovation is expected to increase alongside the market, with companies trying to distinguish themselves and tap into the demand. Bose promises that its first venture into in-ear headphones will offer a wide frequency range and an ergonomic design. The US$100 headphones, (which are not noise-reducing or sound-isolating), can be fitted with three differently sized silicone ear tips to ensure that extended listening is made comfortable.

Bose has replicated its TriPort design, currently used in aviation headsets for pilots, in the headphones. TriPort allows low notes to be broadcast clearly, without increasing the size of the "bud". This theoretically minimizes the need to push the headphones in too deeply or turn the volume up too loud – two problems associated with in-ear products.

The headphones weigh less than one ounce, and the silicone design allows them to “rest” in the ear, rather than being jammed into place.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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