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iNature biodegradable iPhone case

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January 18, 2012

The iNature iPhone cover is 100-percent biodegradable

The iNature iPhone cover is 100-percent biodegradable

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Your iPhone won't last forever. In fact, long before it wears out, chances are that you'll trade up to a higher model. The designers at Italian companies Med Computer and Biomood apparently figured that if the cover that you're using on that phone is bound to become obsolete anyway, why should it last forever? The result is the 100-percent biodegradable iNature soft iPhone cover.

The iNature cover is made from an Italian bio-plastic known as Apinat. According to its makers, the cover snugly fits an iPhone - protecting it against bumps and falls - yet it also won't deteriorate or deform with use, or when subjected to wet environments. It is said to remain straight and rigid along the edges of the display, and incorporates openings to access the phone's various ports and other features.

When it comes time to get rid of the iNature cover, it must be placed in a composting environment. Once there, it should biodegrade by over 90 percent within less than 180 days.

We saw the iNature cover for ourselves last week at the Consumer Electronics Show, where it was named as an honoree in the CES Innovations 2012 Design and Engineering Awards. On display with it was the iNature BioRolly, a biodegradable device for wrapping up loose device cables such as headphone cords.

The iNature BioRolly is a biodegradable cable-winding device

The iNature phone cover is available in several colors and three models, to fit iPhones 3G, 3GS, 4 and 4S. It can be purchased from the product website, for US$19.90. The BioRolly will set you back $7.95.

About the Author
Ben Coxworth An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.   All articles by Ben Coxworth
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