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Bicycles


— Bicycles

Robotic welding arm used to 3D print a stainless steel bike

Although they're still far from being common, 3D-printed metal bicycle frames do now exist. Usually they're made using a sintering process, in which a laser is utilized to selectively melt steel powder, building it up in successive layers. Now, however, a team of students at the Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) in the Netherlands has taken another approach – they've created the world's first stainless steel bike made via a welding-based 3D-printing technique.

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— Bicycles Review

Review: MagLOCK magnetic pedals should attract a certain crowd

Many mountain bikers swear by the pedalling efficiency of so-called clipless pedals, in which a steel cleat on the bottom of each shoe engages a spring-loaded mechanism in the pedal. Some other riders, however, just don't like the idea of being "snapped in" like that. It was with this in mind that cyclist Dave Williams created MagLOCK pedals. They're non-threatening platform pedals, that keep the user's feet in place using magnets instead of mechanisms. We recently had a chance to try them out, and generally liked what they had to offer.

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— Bicycles

Lightweight Freygeist e-bike looks and lifts more like a regular bike

Some are louder than others, but e-bikes are usually easy to spot. Evidence like a battery pack sticking up off the down tube, a thick, rectangular top tube or a large motor on the wheel is hard to miss. German startup Freygeist believes that the electric bike should look and feel more like the classic pedal bike. Its new Classic pedelec is virtually indistinguishable as an electric thanks to cleanly integrated hardware and a 26.5-lb curb weight. You won't notice the electric drive until it kicks in.

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— Bicycles

Garmin's Varia Vision brings smarts to regular cycling glasses

Cyclists already have their pick of several brands of Google Glass-like smart glasses, which display data in riders' peripheral vision – this means that they don't have to look down at a cycling computer or smartphone display, taking their eyes off the road in the process. However, what if they already have a pair of "dumb" glasses that they want to keep using? Well, that's where Garmin's Varia Vision add-on comes in.

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