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Paul Ridden

Paul Ridden

While Paul is loath to reveal his age, he will admit to cutting his IT teeth on a TRS-80 (although he won't say which version). An obsessive fascination with computer technology blossomed from hobby into career before the desire for sunnier climes saw him wave a fond farewell to his native Blighty in favor of Bordeaux, France. He's now a dedicated newshound pursuing the latest bleeding edge tech for Gizmag.

Follow Paul:

— Bicycles

StreetFlyer: hang-gliding on three-wheels

If the notion of flying through the air appeals then hang-gliding might be your first thought. But if your fear of heights keeps you closer to the ground then perhaps Dr Carsten Mehring's StreetFlyer may be of interest. The human-powered three-wheeler suspends its user from an arched frame so that when enough momentum is generated, the legs can be lifted off the ground and you're away – at a cruising altitude of just a few feet. Read More
— Urban Transport

European cities influence travel behavior through parking reforms

A report into inner city parking reforms has found that European cities are leading the way in the battle to coax people into using public transport instead of clogging up city streets with cars. The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) has revealed that cities which have implemented a host of innovative parking policies in recent years are now benefiting from improved air quality and better standards of urban life, all thanks to significant reductions in car use. Read More
— Computers

DreamPlug offers compact, low power, performance computing

Applications developers looking for a low power, small form factor computing solution that won't break the bank will no doubt appreciate the DreamPlug from Globalscale Technologies. Expanding on the company's GuruPlug system, the new low-profile plug computer is powered by a Marvell processor, has half a gigabyte of DDR2 RAM and a generous helping of onboard micro-SD flash memory to store the Linux kernel and root system files. Physical connectivity and expansion options include USB, eSATA, JTAG and UART and the unit also has built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth wireless capabilities. Read More
— Mobile Technology

G-Slate tablet headed for T-Mobile spring release

Motorola's Xoom may have grabbed most of the Android 3.0 headlines of late but it's not the only tablet to run on Google's new tablet-optimized operating system. T-Mobile and LG have announced a spring release window for the newest member of the G-series of mobile devices, the G-Slate. The Tegra 2-powered device features 3D-capable, high definition display and can record stereoscopic HD video via its rear-facing cameras. Wireless connectivity is also given a speed boost thanks to T-Mobile's growing HSPA+ network. Read More
— Music

Access thousands of pickup configurations in one Game Changer guitar

After you've spent a considerable time learning to play guitar or bass, you're then likely to want to find an individual tone. For most of us, this involves the never-ending search for an instrument that fits our personality, or taking what we can afford and switching out the pickups or, if you're brave, more advanced rewiring. With the aptly-named Game Changer from Ernie Ball's Music Man wing, you can hang up the soldering iron for good and still get access to millions of tonal variations in one guitar or bass. Read More
— Mobile Technology

New tablet typing app developed for Android Honeycomb

TouchType has now transferred its touchscreen typing smarts from smartphones to the big screen, bigger than a smartphone anyway. The company has launched a new tablet version of its SwiftKey typing app to coincide with the release of Android 3.0 (Honeycomb) and the launch of the Xoom tablet from Motorola. The app is claimed to make touchscreen typing more intuitive thanks to an improved version of the Fluency predictive text engine and easier thanks to optimized keyboard layouts and multi-language support. Read More
— Games

Add some audio oomph to portable gaming with Razer's new Ferox speakers

Getting caught up in the game depends just as much on immersive audio as it does engaging visuals. Gaming specialist Razer reckons that it's come up with a pair of portable gaming speakers that offer listeners room-filling, omnidirectional sonic enjoyment in a very compact package. The new Ferox speakers feature a rising resonance chamber mechanism, which is sure to prove a talking point in addition to providing some bass oomph. Read More
— Digital Cameras

New Cyber-shots with big zoom announced

Sony has announced a couple of superzoom additions to its Cyber-shot camera range. Both the compact and the DSLR-like models can record full high definition movies, are GPS-enabled and have the ability to generate 3D stills without requiring the now familiar dual lens setup seen in other cameras. They both offer autofocus speeds comparable to digital SLRs and borrow some advanced technology from the company's Handycam camcorders. Read More
— Science

Researchers able to lift fingerprints from clothing

Promising early results from research undertaken by the University of Abertay Dundee and the Scottish Police Services Authority could lead to fingerprint evidence being obtained from clothing, for use in criminal prosecution. Refining an existing technique that's been used to successfully recover print detail from smooth objects such as glass and plastic, forensic scientists have managed to create a kind of photo negative of fingerprint impressions on fabric. It's a bit hit and miss at the moment, but even when clear ridge detail isn't retrieved, the technique could still prove useful to investigators looking for other evidence. Read More
— Science

Hubble finds a new contender for galaxy distance record

Pushing the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to the very limit of its technical ability, an international collaboration of astronomers believe they have discovered the oldest and furthest ancient galaxy ever seen. Light from the new object is thought to have taken some 13.2 billion years to reach the telescope, with the age of the Universe itself said to be 13.7 billion years. It's also said to be older than the current record holder, which set the bar by forming 600 million years after the Big Bang. Read More