Decision time? Read Gizmag's latest product comparisons

Nick Lavars

Nick Lavars
Nick was born outside of Melbourne, Australia, with a general curiosity that has drawn him to some distant (and very cold) places. Somewhere between enduring a winter in the Canadian Rockies and trekking through Chilean Patagonia, he graduated from university and pursued a career in journalism. Having worked for publications such as The Santiago Times and The Conversation, he now writes for Gizmag from Melbourne, excited by tech and all forms of innovation, the city's bizarre weather and curried egg sandwiches.
Top Articles by Nick Lavars
  • Shimano launches its own waterproof HD action cam

    Shimano has made its first foray into the increasingly crowded action cam market with the CM-1000 Sport Camera. Lightweight and HD-capable, the camera is ANT+ compatible and could prove a useful tool for reviewing performance.

  • Germany's first waste-free supermarket about to open its doors

    Aiming to open its doors this (northern) summer, Original Unverpackt is set to become Germany's first waste-free supermarket. Customers bring containers to take the produce away, borrow reusable containers from the store or use bags made from recycle...

  • Sony puts 4K Ultra Short Throw projector up against the wall

    Sony is demoing a prototype of its 4K Ultra Short Throw Projector at CES that is designed to look like a piece of furniture and has the ability to cast images up to 147-inches in size from a distance of around 20 in (50 cm).

  • DARPA's guided sniper bullet changes path mid-flight

    The accuracy of snipers is often dictated by wind, rain dust and not to mention, targets constantly on the move. As it turns out, over the last few months DARPA has been conducting live-fire tests of guided .50 caliber bullets, a development that cou...

  • Earin: The "world's smallest wireless earbuds"

    A team of engineers has developed what they are claiming is the world's smallest wireless earbud. In creating Earin, the vision of the team, was to produce earbuds that not only did away with the messy wires and cables, but fit snugly in the ear to p...

The Darma smart cushion is embedded with fiber optic sensors to track a person's posture t...

We have seen posture trackers that attach to our backs and waists, but if we were to look to any part of our body to keep tabs on our sitting habits, it would be our backsides that know best, right? The team behind Darma is banking on our buttocks painting a clearer picture, developing a smart cushion that monitors how we sit to provide feedback on posture, stress levels, heart rate and respiration.  Read More

The Invisiband bracelets slowly releases oil from geranium flowers to ward off mosquitoes Lathering yourself in mosquito-repelling lotions might not be ideal, but it's better than those red swellings that would otherwise pop up on any exposed skin. The Invisaband releases a natural oil to confuse mosquitoes' senses, saving you from bites and applying layers of oily repellents.  Read More

The Electric Bubblegum Board features 3D-printed parts

Electric skateboards may be getting faster and lighter, but that doesn't mean they've been getting a great deal cheaper. And what better way to fix that than to add a little 3D printing to the mix? The Bubblegum board is an electric skateboard with 3D-printable components, meaning not only is it initially cheaper to produce, but users can keep their ride in working order by printing out new parts as required.  Read More

A study carried out at MIT suggests that altering the quantities of materials in cement mi...

As one of our most relied upon construction materials, concrete makes a significant contribution to our overall carbon emissions. Calcium-based substances are heated at high temperatures to form the cement, a process that produces carbon dioxide. But by slightly altering the quantities of materials used, scientists from MIT have uncovered a new method of cement mixing that could reduce these emissions by more than half.  Read More

The US aviation authority has granted exemptions for video-equipped drones to be used in f...

The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has today granted exemptions to six Hollywood studios to use drones in film production. The move marks significant progress in a collective push from commercial entities to tap into the potential of UAVs, something that the FAA as so far determined a no-go zone.  Read More

The skin-like patch changes color as it detects changes in temperature of the skin's surfa...

Researchers from Northwestern University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a health monitor capable of tracking heart and skin condition while worn discretely on the skin. Measuring around 5 cm squared (0.8 in sq), the patch is designed to be inconspicuous and alert the user to conditions ranging from dry skin to cardiovascular problems.  Read More

Facebook hopes to begin testing its solar-powered UAVs in 2015, with the ultimate aim of d...

There was an understandable amount of skepticism when Amazon announced its grand plans for delivery drones last year. But if the last twelve months are any indication, Jeff Bezos and his fellow tech heavyweights are actually kinda serious about the potential of unmanned aerial vehicles. Speaking at the Social Good Summit in New York on Monday, engineering director at Facebook Connectivity Lab, Yael Maguire, has further detailed the company's vision of internet-carrying drones, with plans to begin testing in 2015.  Read More

By playing around with materials, researchers have reduced the operating temperature of an...

Our ability to store energy has proven a big hurdle in the adoption of renewable energies. But now a team of researchers from MIT has developed a new all-liquid battery system that extends the life of such devices while also costing less to make, a development they say could make wind and solar energy more competitive with traditional sources of power.  Read More

The adhesive material developed at MIT is based on mussel foot proteins and retains its st...

Clingy barnacles might be something of a nuisance for seafarers, but these stubborn shellfish and their relatives could hold the key to a new breed of sticky materials. Engineers from MIT have created waterproof adhesives based on the proteins that give these creatures such qualities, a development that could one day be used in ship repairs or medical applications.  Read More

With US$15 million up for grabs, XPrize is hoping to inspire a revolutionary set of educat...

Having tasked technologists with challenges as diverse as Ted Talkin' artificial intelligence and bringing Star Trek's iconic tricorder to life, XPrize has now turned its attention to an equally ambitious task. Millions of children around the globe don't have basic literacy skills, presenting a problem that cannot be solved without some big picture thinking. Launching today, the Global Learning XPrize offers US$15 million in prize money for the development of software that teaches children these vital skills in the space of 18 months, without the presence of a teacher.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 28,720 articles