Top 100: The most desirable cars of all time

Nick Lavars

Nick Lavars
Nick was born outside of Melbourne, Australia, with a general curiosity that has drawn him to some distant (and very cold) places. Somewhere between enduring a winter in the Canadian Rockies and trekking through Chilean Patagonia, he graduated from university and pursued a career in journalism. Having worked for publications such as The Santiago Times and The Conversation, he now writes for Gizmag from Melbourne, excited by tech and all forms of innovation, the city's bizarre weather and curried egg sandwiches.
Top Articles by Nick Lavars
  • Shimano launches its own waterproof HD action cam

    Shimano has made its first foray into the increasingly crowded action cam market with the CM-1000 Sport Camera. Lightweight and HD-capable, the camera is ANT+ compatible and could prove a useful tool for reviewing performance.

  • Air umbrella produces a "force field" of air to keep you dry

    People certainly haven't been afraid to try and reinvent the umbrella over the years.Now a team of Chinese designers are looking to do away with the awkward metal poles and canopy altogether, relying instead on a "force field" of air to keep you nice...

  • Motorized Big Wheel Drift Trike speaks to your inner child

    Auto parts manufacturer SFD Industries is at the forefront of a rise in motorized trike drifting, and is staking its claim in the form of the Big Wheel Drift Trike. Packing a whopping 26-inch front wheel, it runs on a 6.5 hp motor and is proportioned...

  • Germany's first waste-free supermarket about to open its doors

    Aiming to open its doors this (northern) summer, Original Unverpackt is set to become Germany's first waste-free supermarket. Customers bring containers to take the produce away, borrow reusable containers from the store or use bags made from recycle...

  • Sony puts 4K Ultra Short Throw projector up against the wall

    Sony is demoing a prototype of its 4K Ultra Short Throw Projector at CES that is designed to look like a piece of furniture and has the ability to cast images up to 147-inches in size from a distance of around 20 in (50 cm).

The Desolenator produces clean drinking water using sunlight

Desalination may one day prove the savior for regions of the world where clean drinking water is scarce, but current technology dictates that this process is often expensive and energy-intensive. The team behind the Desolenator has high hopes of delivering water security to those in need, with a mobile desalinator that runs purely on energy from the sun.  Read More

3D printing models of tumors and their surrounding organs could help specialists to delive...

Administering the correct dosages to fight cancerous tumors can be a difficult balancing act. Too much of the radioactive drugs can cause harm to healthy tissue, but not enough will see the cancer cells survive and continue to spread. But a new technique developed at The Institute of Cancer Research in London may afford doctors an unprecedented level of accuracy in performing radiotherapy, using 3D-printed replicas of a patient’s organs and tumors to better determine how much radiation a tumor has received.  Read More

The Odyssée system uses wave power to churn out clean drinking water

Watching on as the waves crashed against the cliffs of South Corsica, France, mechanical engineer Dragan Tutić knew some were already drawing on power from the ocean to generate electricity. But a possible use for all that motion in the ocean that had been largely unexplored, as far as he knew, was turning its salty seawater into the fresh, drinkable variety on the spot. In the following two and a half years, Tutić and his team designed and tested a prototype for a wave-powered desalinator, and now hold hopes of deploying the system in regions where water scarcity threatens the survival of coastal communities.  Read More

Iron nanoparticles (blue), tethered to the ion channel seen (red) by a protein (green) hav...

Sufferers of type 1 diabetes regularly need to inject themselves with insulin in order to regulate levels of sugar in their blood, a process that is invasive and requires particular care. But a new study conducted at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute suggests that more comfortable treatment methods may not be all that far away, with scientists remotely manipulating insulin production in mice using electromagnetic waves.  Read More

The Power Pen can work as a pen, stylus or a 700 mAh backup battery for your phone The choices abound when it comes to external charging solutions these days, but one idea we haven’t come across, at least not in the era of today’s smartphone, is a writing pen with a backup battery packed inside.  Read More

Polaroid's long-awaited Socialmatic camera can now be preordered for US$299

In long-awaited news for Instagram devotees looking for something a little more tangible to archive their favorite moments, the Polaroid Socialmatic is now available for preorder. The camera has the ability to capture and print photos much like the original Polaroid cameras, but is equipped with Wi-Fi to enable sharing over the internet.  Read More

The Nest smart thermostat can now be controlled from within Google's smartphone app Google paying US$3.2 billion for smart thermostat company Nest gave an indication of the company's vision for the connected home Now, almost a year later, the company has integrated control of the thermostat with its Google smartphone app, letting owners control their Nest via voice commands and enabling location-based services.  Read More

Scientists have identified a protein that regulates fat levels in worms and could do the s...

Research around how the body's fat levels are regulated and ways in which they might be manipulated has uncovered numerous potential fat switches. The latest is a particular protein that has long been known to regulate protein synthesis and has now been demonstrated to also control fat levels in worms. This has lead researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) to believe that the version found in the human body could provide a new target for fat-fighting pharmaceuticals.  Read More

3D printing technology has enabled some truly life-changing surgeries in the past year

Though printing items like chocolate and pizza might be satisfying enough for some, 3D printing still holds a lot of unfulfilled potential. Talk abounds of disrupting manufacturing, changing the face of construction and even building metal components in space. While it is hard not to get a little bit excited by these potentially world-changing advances, there is one domain where 3D printing is already having a real-life impact. Its capacity to produce customized implants and medical devices tailored specifically to a patient's anatomy has seen it open up all kinds of possibilities in the field of medicine, with the year 2014 having turned up one world-first surgery after another. Let's cast our eye over some of the significant, life-changing procedures to emerge in the past year made possible by 3D printing technology.  Read More

A sensor made from organic materials can be worn like a Band-Aid to track blood oxygen lev...

Maintaining a steady blood oxygen level is critical for the body to stave off breathing problems and organ trouble. For those needing to keep a close eye on things, there's no shortage of monitoring systems and dedicated pulse oximeters available, but these can be somewhat unwieldy. Scientists at the University of California (UC) Berkeley are looking to make the process a little less cumbersome with the development of a thin, blood-oxygen sensor that can be worn much like a Band-Aid.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 29,888 articles
Editor's Choice
Product Comparisons