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James Holloway

James Holloway
James lives in East London where he punctuates endless tea drinking with freelance writing and meteorological angst. Unlocking Every Extend Extra Extreme’s “Master of Extreme” achievement was the fourth proudest moment of his life.
Top Articles by James Holloway
The text you see when you go to Hemingway

Hemingway is a simple web app designed to help writers write simpler copy. You can't save documents, share them, organize them or comment on them. You just paste in your text, follow its advice, and copy it to get it out again. But it's very effective.  Read More

Droplet works by selectively watering the plants in your garden

There's no two ways about it: your common or garden sprinkler (so garden, in all probability) is a blithering half-wit. Rain or no, if you don't turn it off, it'll water your lawn whether it needs it or not, and much more besides. The Droplet wants to change all that. A sort of "smart" water cannon, it knows which parts of your garden to water, and when.  Read More

The Onewheel

I don't know about you, but I know that when I pop out on my electric skateboard to do a spot of shopping, I always find myself thinking "hello – this would even more exciting with three fewer wheels." Apparently the people at California's Future Motion agree, judging from the Onewheel electric skateboard they've cooked up that is, cunningly named after the number of wheels it has (i.e. one).  Read More

Software controllers go modular

Described by its creators as the first freeform software controller, Palette is a range of buttons, dials and sliders made so that creative types can design their own hardware interfaces for their software of choice, be it for music creation, photo-editing or gaming.  Read More

Taizhou Bridge under construction

The 2,940-m long Taizhou Bridge has won the Supreme Award for Structural Engineering Excellence at this year's Structural Awards. The event gives the nod to a variety of structures across numerous categories, but it was the three-tower, long-span suspension bridge, the first of its kind, which received the overall "Supreme" gong. Read more about the project and the individual category winners after the cut.  Read More

S3tr: lean machine

At first glance, you might think the S3tr (which is apparently pronounced Streeter) is a knockdown answer to the Segway PT. Like the PT, the S3tr is a compact one-person vehicle driven by a standing rider who balances on a wheeled base and steers with the aid of an upright column. The S3tr has three wheels to the PT's two, but its main advantage is that it folds up, in theory making it more easy to take aboard public transport, or stowing under a desk at work.  Read More

Sou Fujimito's bus stop design is perhaps the most abstract The local cultural association of the small Austrian market town of Krumbach has invited a range of international architects to submit their takes on the humble bus stop. The results are in, and one minimal design has already been built.  Read More

Manuel Dominguez' Very Large Structure (Image CC BY-SA Manuel Dominguez)

Of all the questions one might like to ask Manuel Domínguez about his architecture thesis project, why he called it Very Large Structure is probably low on the list. Domínguez' concept depicts compactly planned cities atop vast mobile structures, capable of crawling to new locations as the needs or desires of the populace dictate. The idea clearly recalls Ron Herron's Walking City essay for Archigram in 1964, and though Domínguez cites that as an inspiration, he says it's just one among many. Real-world technology seems to have been the main influence.  Read More

The so-called 'resolutiongate' surrounding the early cross-format games is raising concern...

With the launches of Sony's PlayStation 4 and Microsoft's Xbox One now a matter of mere days away, excitement and hype levels have entered the stratosphere. On paper, the PlayStation 4 has arguably looked the more capable games console, with Xbox One tailored more as an all-in media hub. But with the first cross-format games emerging, some are concerned that the performance gap may be bigger than foretold. Why? And can the gap be closed?  Read More

It appears that Nippon Moon remains a concept for now (Image: UNStudio)

With Nippon Moon, UNStudio is bringing more than sheer scale to the concept of the enormous observation wheel. Though the height of the wheel has not been fixed, Nippon Moon is clearly intended to put Japan on the map (the map of gigantic ferris wheels, that is), and compete with, if not surpass, the likes of the 165-m Singapore Flyer and the 135-m London Eye. However, UNStudio hints that smartphone apps or even augmented reality could be used to enhance the ride, and make it an observation wheel fit for the 21st century.  Read More

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