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Darren Quick

Darren Quick

Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.

— Health & Wellbeing

Senolytics: A new class of drugs with the potential to slow the aging process

It's a cruel irony that when we're young we want to be older, but when we're older we want to be younger. While few would advocate research into ways to make kids grow up faster, there are plenty of efforts underway looking to forestall the rigors of age. The latest cause for hope in this area comes in the form of a new class of drugs called senolytics, which have been shown to dramatically slow the aging process in animal models. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

Researchers discover hormone that mimics diabetes-preventing effects of exercise

All manner of weird and wonderful exercise contraptions pushed on late night infomercials are testament to people's desire for faster and easier ways to get the benefits of exercise – whether said contraptions are effective or not. But now researchers have discovered a hormone that could provide some of the benefits of exercise, without working up a sweat doing stomach crunches or bicep curls. Read More
— Mobile Technology

The eyes have it for unlocking ZTE's Grand S3

Unlocking early smartphones was as simple as pushing a couple of buttons, which were conveniently pointed out by the phone itself. Thankfully, as the devices became repositories for more and more personal information, security in the form of passcodes and squiggles, along with voice and fingerprint sensors have become standard. Now eye scans have been added to the list in ZTE's flagship Grand S3 smartphone. Read More
— Aircraft

Carbon nanotube-based anti-icing coating proves itself in wind tunnel testing

There are numerous types of systems designed to prevent ice forming on aircraft surfaces during flight. Some reroute hot air produced by jet engines, others generate their own heat, others knock ice off through mechanical force, while others still release antifreeze chemicals onto the wing. Battelle has recently tested its carbon nanotube-base HeatCoat technology that it claims is lighter and less power hungry than such systems. It also has no moving parts and could easily be retrofitted to existing aircraft. Read More
— Materials

Limpets sink their teeth into world's strongest natural material crown

Spider's silk has long been the strongest natural material known to man, prompting researchers to attempt to uncover its secrets so they can replicate its remarkable properties in man-made materials. But scientists now have a new source of inspiration in the form of limpet teeth, which are made of a material researchers say is potentially stronger than spider silk, is comparable in strength to the strongest commercial carbon fibers, and could one day be copied for use in cars, boats and planes. Read More
— Automotive

Rolls-Royce to jump on SUV bandwagon

Rolls-Royce is a name synonymous with automotive luxury. And after 111 years of producing handcrafted sedans, coupes and convertibles, the company has now announced that its famous Spirit of Ecstasy hood ornament will soon adorn "a vehicle that can cross any terrain", which we can take to mean an SUV rather than a tank. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

Probiotic treatment cures peanut allergy in children

Last year, scientists from the University of Chicago found that a probiotic therapy using a common gut bacteria prevented sensitization to peanut allergens – in mice. Now researchers at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute in Melbourne, Australia, have shown that a similar probiotic treatment, this time involving Lactobacillus rhamnosus, has a similar effect, but this time in children. Read More
— Around The Home Review

Review: Oplink TripleShield security system

Fences, gates, dogs and locks – these have been the cornerstones of home security for centuries. But modern technology has given homeowners the ability to supplement such measures with camera-based DIY systems that, in addition to acting as a deterrent, can help catch criminals either in the act or afterwards. One such system is the Oplink TripleShield system, which we recently had the opportunity to try out. Read More
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