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Darren Quick

Darren Quick

Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.

— Mobile Technology

The eyes have it for unlocking ZTE's Grand S3

By - March 1, 2015 2 Pictures
Unlocking early smartphones was as simple as pushing a couple of buttons, which were conveniently pointed out by the phone itself. Thankfully, as the devices became repositories for more and more personal information, security in the form of passcodes and squiggles, along with voice and fingerprint sensors have become standard. Now eye scans have been added to the list in ZTE's flagship Grand S3 smartphone. Read More
— Aircraft

Carbon nanotube-based anti-icing coating proves itself in wind tunnel testing

By - February 22, 2015 3 Pictures
There are numerous types of systems designed to prevent ice forming on aircraft surfaces during flight. Some reroute hot air produced by jet engines, others generate their own heat, others knock ice off through mechanical force, while others still release antifreeze chemicals onto the wing. Battelle has recently tested its carbon nanotube-base HeatCoat technology that it claims is lighter and less power hungry than such systems. It also has no moving parts and could easily be retrofitted to existing aircraft. Read More
— Science

Limpets sink their teeth into world's strongest natural material crown

By - February 18, 2015 2 Pictures
Spider's silk has long been the strongest natural material known to man, prompting researchers to attempt to uncover its secrets so they can replicate its remarkable properties in man-made materials. But scientists now have a new source of inspiration in the form of limpet teeth, which are made of a material researchers say is potentially stronger than spider silk, is comparable in strength to the strongest commercial carbon fibers, and could one day be copied for use in cars, boats and planes. Read More
— Automotive

Rolls-Royce to jump on SUV bandwagon

By - February 17, 2015 1 Picture
Rolls-Royce is a name synonymous with automotive luxury. And after 111 years of producing handcrafted sedans, coupes and convertibles, the company has now announced that its famous Spirit of Ecstasy hood ornament will soon adorn "a vehicle that can cross any terrain", which we can take to mean an SUV rather than a tank. Read More

Swaying this way saves energy while walking

Just two days after opening, The London Millennium Footbridge was closed to eliminate its sway. Turns out staying with the sway would have had its benefits, as researchers have found that it reduces the amount of energy expended when walking across the bridge. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Probiotic treatment cures peanut allergy in children

By - January 29, 2015 1 Picture
Last year, scientists from the University of Chicago found that a probiotic therapy using a common gut bacteria prevented sensitization to peanut allergens – in mice. Now researchers at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute in Melbourne, Australia, have shown that a similar probiotic treatment, this time involving Lactobacillus rhamnosus, has a similar effect, but this time in children. Read More
— Around The Home Review

Review: Oplink TripleShield security system

By - January 28, 2015 16 Pictures
Fences, gates, dogs and locks – these have been the cornerstones of home security for centuries. But modern technology has given homeowners the ability to supplement such measures with camera-based DIY systems that, in addition to acting as a deterrent, can help catch criminals either in the act or afterwards. One such system is the Oplink TripleShield system, which we recently had the opportunity to try out. Read More
— Medical

Microcapsule delivery method opens door for protein to treat osteoarthritis

By - January 20, 2015 1 Picture
Although known to reduce inflammation and aid in the repair of damaged tissue, the protein molecule called C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) could not previously be put to use in treating osteoarthritis as it breaks down easily in the body. But now researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) could make this possible by using slow-release microcapsules containing the protein. Read More
— Science

Lifespan of fruit flies prolonged by selecting best cells in the body

By - January 15, 2015 1 Picture
Using a technique in which better cells in the body to be selected at the expense of more damaged ones, researchers at the University of Bern in Switzerland have managed to significantly increase the lifespan of the common fruit fly. Although most people would like to see flies living shorter, not longer lives, the development could have implications for increasing the lifespan of humans. Read More
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