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Darren Quick

Darren Quick

Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.

— Wearables

MagnifiSense uses electromagnetic signatures to keep tabs on your energy use

From the Fitbit to the Apple Watch, there's no shortage of wearable devices that track your daily activity with an eye on your personal health and wellbeing, but a new device developed at the University of Washington (UW) can track your activity as it pertains to the health of the planet. Called MagnifiSense, the wrist-worn prototype detects what devices and vehicles the wearer interacts with throughout the day to help track their carbon footprint.

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— Materials

Origami and the art of structural engineering

From military shelters and solar arrays to batteries and drones, engineers continue to prove that origami can be the inspiration for more than just paper cranes. The latest creation inspired by the ancient art of paper folding is a new "zippered tube" design that forms paper structures with enough stiffness to support weight, but can be folded flat for shipping or storage. The scaleable technique could be used in anything from microscopic robots and biomedical devices, to buildings and bridges.

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— Around The Home

Neato's robot vacuum cleaner joins the Internet of Things

We first came across Neato Robotics' XV-11 robot vacuum cleaner at CES 2010, and the company has been rolling out additions to its lineup ever since, introducing the "pet-strength" XV-21 in 2012, its Signature Series in 2013 and the Botvac line in 2014. At IFA, Neato is showing the latest dust-sucker to join its Botvac team. The Botvac Connected, as the name suggests, packs Wi-Fi connectivity for control from a user's smartphone.

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— Computers

Seagate packs 2 TB of storage into 7 mm-thick laptop hard drive

When it comes to data storage capacity, too much is never enough. But Seagate is doing its best to sate people's craving for gigabytes on the go by announcing the world's highest capacity 2.5-inch hard drive. Equaling the 2 TB capacity of the Samsung Spinpoint M9T that the company unveiled back in 2013, the new drive is 2.5 mm thinner than that unit, stretching the calipers to just 7 mm.

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— Materials

Naturally-occurring protein has melting ice cream problem licked

There are few things that go as well together as an ice cream cone and a hot summer's day, but it can be a race against the clock to get the sweet treat down before it turns into a sticky mess. Such disasters could become a thing of the past thanks to scientists in Scotland who have discovered a naturally-occurring protein that can be added to ice cream to make it melt more slowly.

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— Mobile Technology

Roll up, roll up: LG targets mobile accessory market with portable Rolly Keyboard

Touchscreens may be extremely versatile and a good fit for mobile devices, but one thing they don't lend themselves to well is extended typing sessions. As a result, we've seen numerous portable keyboards designed to easily fit in a pocket alongside your smartphone. Now LG is getting in on the act with its Rolly Keyboard, which it calls the industry's first solid rollable wireless portable keyboard.

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— Medical

Mice brainpower boosted with alteration of a single gene

"Ignorance is bliss," so the old saying goes, but who wouldn't give their brainpower a boost if they had the chance? By altering a single gene to inhibit the activity of an enzyme called phosphodiesterase (PDE4B), researchers have given mice the opportunity to see what an increase in intelligence is like. While many people would welcome such a treatment, the scientists say their research could lead to new treatments for those with cognitive disorders and age-related cognitive decline.

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