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Darren Quick

Darren Quick

Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.

— Computers

Samsung’s 70 Series LCD monitors perfect for work and play

By - May 10, 2009
Samsung is definitely getting its money’s worth out of the manufacturing process that produces its proprietary high-gloss Touch of Color (ToC) finish. ToC can be found on everything from the company's latest TVs to its latest camcorders. Now computer monitors can be added to that list with the release of the 70 Series monitors. The new LCD monitors not only boast a crystal-like bezel with ToC finish, but also they feature the contrast and response of Samsung’s LCD TVs, making them ideal for watching TV as well as displaying the office spreadsheet or playing games. Read More
— Medical

Researchers develop smart monitoring device for brain injury

By - May 8, 2009
A multi-purpose “lab on a tube” developed by Engineers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) could provide significant advance in the treatment of traumatic brain injury. A serious knock on the head results in not only the initial damage, but a second wave of injury caused by swelling and lack of oxygen among other factors. Currently, the status of these injuries can only be intermittently examined, but the “lab on a tube” gives medicos the capability to continuously monitor crucial physiological characteristics. Read More
— Computers

LaCie releases new high capacity network storage drives

By - May 7, 2009 9 Pictures
With the advantage of freeing up a server to concentrate on tasks besides file serving, Network Attached Storage (NAS) devices have become an increasingly popular option for small offices and home users over the last few years. LaCie has two new high capacity NAS solutions for anyone considering going this route – the Big Disk Network and d2 Network. The d2 Network supports up to 1.5TB capacity, while the Big Disk Network combines two drives in a RAID 0 setting, for up to 4TBs of storage. Read More
— Computers

MSi gx laptops get turbo boost

By - May 7, 2009 2 Pictures
If there’s one button that could possibly be more tempting than “do not press”, it's the one with “turbo” written on it. Perhaps recognizing this MSi has included a turbo button on its new GX623 and GX633 laptops that ramps up the speed of the CPU when the laptops are connected to mains power. If instead you’re looking for reduced power consumption and longer battery life, MSi’s ECO Engine can cycle through a range of power setting tweaks at the touch of a button. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Panasonic 2009 TV range wrap-up

By - May 7, 2009 12 Pictures
Although LCD has been clearly outselling plasmas TVs in recent times, plasma still maintains a number of advantages over its rival format, most notably in contrast ratio. So while some manufacturers, such as Pioneer, have ceased making plasma panels, Panasonic is persisting, with plans to launch 11 new VIERA plasma models this year. Although the company understands the value of LCD, too, with nine LCD models included in the 2009 VIERA TV line-up. Read More
— Automotive

Formula 3 racing car powered by chocolate and steered by carrots - seriously

By - May 6, 2009 9 Pictures
Environmentally friendly vehicles conjure up thoughts of a Toyota Prius hybrid or maybe a vehicle powered by hydrogen fuel cells, but a Formula 3 racing car generally wouldn’t be the first thing to come to mind. This "WorldFirst Formula 3 car" unveiled by researchers at the University of Warwick might just change that impression - and it's eco-friendliness goes way beyond the bio diesel engine that drives it. The racer is powered by chocolate, steered by carrots, has bodywork made from potatoes and can still do 125mph around corners. Read More
— Children

Toy Amphibious Tank packs water cannon and 4WD

By - May 6, 2009 7 Pictures
May 6, 2009 If there’s one thing besides the retreat of my hairline and expansion of my waist that makes me wish I was a kid again, it’s the seemingly endless supply of cool toys that today’s youngsters have to entertain them. While I was forced to make do with a stick and a piece of string growing up, the children of today get to enjoy toys like the transforming Amphibious Tank – a remote controlled tank that is as happy on land is it is in the bathtub and comes complete with a water cannon to smite your enemies. Read More
— Electronics

JVC launches flicker-free 3D TV

By - May 6, 2009
It certainly looks like those who enjoy a third dimension in their onscreen entertainment will be spoilt for choice in the not-too-distant future. Following the establishment of several full-scale 3D movie production and distribution companies in 2008, Hollywood has more than 20 3D movies in the pipeline this year. In the meantime, JVC has launched a 46-inch Full HD 3D LCD monitor – initially for professional use – that will deliver "a natural, flicker-free visual experience" in 3D. Read More
— Electronics

Forensics toolkit cracks open the Xbox gaming console

By - May 5, 2009
Those who think the Xbox game console may be the perfect place to hide illicit material from prying eyes – principally because it isn't seen as a regular-joe PC – had better think again. Computer scientist David Collins has developed a toolkit that allows police and other law-enforcement agencies to recover criminal data more easily from hard drives like the Xbox Read More
— Military

Smiths Detection rolls-out handheld chemical and biological agent detectors

By - May 5, 2009 3 Pictures
It may be a sad reflection of the times we live in, but there’s a growing worldwide demand for devices capable of detecting chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRNE) threats. Detecting such threats in a laboratory environment is all well and good, but to really save lives such detection needs to be carried out at the site of the threat. That means a detection device that offers lab quality results with a portable form factor - both qualities that Smiths Detection promises in its range of threat detection systems now being rolled-out worldwide. Read More
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