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Darren Quick

Darren Quick

Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.

— Medical

PrintAlive 3D bioprinter creates on-demand skin grafts for burn victims

By - September 30, 2014 5 Pictures
While most are familiar with the potential for 3D printers to pump out plastic odds and ends for around the home, the technology also has far-reaching applications in the medical field. Research is already underway to develop 3D bioprinters able to create things as complex as human organs, and now engineering students in Canada have created a 3D printer that produces skin grafts for burn victims. Read More
— Medical

Pulley mechanism implant to better restore hand function

By - September 26, 2014 1 Picture
We've seen a number of robotic prosthetic hands intended for amputees, but what about those that still have their hands but have lost function through nerve damage? Researchers at Oregon State University (OSU) have tackled the problem and come up with an implant consisting of a simple pulley system that would more effectively transfer mechanical forces and allow more natural grasping function with less effort. Read More
— Medical

Airway muscle-on-a-chip to aid in search for new asthma treatments

By - September 24, 2014 3 Pictures
Unfortunately for asthma sufferers and those looking to develop new treatments to help them, animal models traditionally used to test potential new drugs don't always mimic human responses. Joining lungs and guts, scientists at Harvard's Wyss Institute have now developed a human airway muscle-on-a-chip that could help in the search for new treatments for asthma. The device accurately mimics the way smooth muscle contracts in the human airway, both under normal circumstances and when exposed to asthma triggers. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Blood test provides first objective diagnosis of depression in adults

By - September 22, 2014 1 Picture
Diagnosing depression can be a difficult task, currently relying on patients reporting symptoms – something those suffering depression don't always do – and doctors correctly interpreting them – which isn't easy as the symptoms are non-specific. Now researchers have developed a blood test to diagnose depression in adults, providing the first objective, scientific diagnosis for the condition. Read More
— Military

Turret flight tests to pave the way for laser weapons on military aircraft

By - September 17, 2014 2 Pictures
High energy laser (HEL) systems have been the subject of military research for decades, but it is only in recent years that the technology has advanced to the point where it is feasible for such systems to be mounted on military ground vehicles and sea vessels. Initial flight tests have now been conducted on a new aircraft laser turret that will help pave the way for HEL systems to be integrated into military aircraft. Read More
— Environment

Newly-discovered waste-eating bacteria could help in nuclear waste disposal

By - September 10, 2014 1 Picture
"Extremophile" bacteria have been found thriving in soil samples from a highly alkaline industrial site in Peak District of England. Although the site is not radioactive, the conditions are similar to the alkaline conditions expected to be found in cement-based radioactive waste sites. The researchers say the capability of the bacteria to thrive in such conditions and feed on isosaccharinic acid (ISA) make it a promising candidate for aiding in nuclear waste disposal. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Put your feet up (for three years): TiVo Mega records over 26,000 hours of TV

By - September 9, 2014 2 Pictures
TiVo obviously believes things have improved since 1992 when Bruce Springsteen sang about 57 Channels (And Nothin' On). The company has announced the TiVo Mega, a digital video recorder (DVR) that packs a whopping 24 TB capacity. This allows the device to store over 26,000 hours of TV, which translates to around three years of non-stop viewing – which would stretch the endurance of the most dedicated TV marathoner. Read More
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