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Darren Quick

Digital Cameras

GoPro's six-camera, 360-degree VR rig up for preorder

The day before it revealed its 16-camera Odyssey rig at Google I/O last year, GoPro announced it was working on a drone as well a six-camera spherical array that was later named the Omni. We may still be waiting for the drone, but at NAB this week the company opened up preorders for the Omni and launched a dedicated platform for sharing and viewing VR content via the web or a new app for iOS and Android devices.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Heat the best option for treating jellyfish stings

They may look innocuous, but jellyfish can pack a serious sting. And with some species benefitting from oceans warming due to climate change, the number of swimmers getting a nasty surprise in the water is likely to rise. There has long been a debate whether it's best to treat jellyfish stings with heat or cold, and now a team from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa claims to have reached a definitive answer.Read More

First US-produced Airbus makes maiden flight

Last September, Airbus officially launched its new North American aircraft assembly plant in Mobile, Alabama, joining final assembly lines located in France, Germany, Spain and China. The first aircraft produced at the facility, an A321 that will join JetBlue's fleet, has now flown for the first time in the skies over Mobile.Read More

Environment

Eggs to help bring bioplastics out of their shell

Confucious say, "the green reed which bends in the wind is stronger than the mighty oak which breaks in a storm." The same concept applies to packaging materials, which must protect their contents from the rough and tumble of transport without breaking. Petroleum-based plastics that can take centuries to break down remain the go-to material for such applications, but researchers have found that adding broken eggshells to a bioplastic mix results in a biodegradable material with the strength and flexibility required for packaging purposes.Read More

Wearables

Toyota's guide collar for the blind and visually impaired

Autonomous vehicles promise to make it much easier for the blind and visually impaired to get around by car, but Toyota is looking to extend the advantages provided by the technology to when they get out of the car. The automaker is developing a wearable device that can take in the user's surroundings and relay information to them via audio and vibration cues.Read More

Medical

Clearing out damaged cells in mice extends lifespan by up to 35 percent

As we age, cells within our bodies can become damaged. As a way of helping prevent cancers developing, a biological mechanism called cellular senescence stops these damaged cells from dividing. Researchers at Mayo Clinic have now shown that clearing these senescent cells from the body of mice can improve health and extend their lifespan by up to 35 percent without any apparent adverse side effects.Read More

Materials

Nanoscale lattice is world's smallest

Scientists from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have created a tiny lattice they claim is the world's smallest. Formed with struts and braces measuring less than 10 micrometers in length and less than 200 nanometers in diameter, the 3D lattice has a total size of less than 10 micrometers, but boasts a higher specific strength than most solids.Read More

GE turns out the lights on CFLs

Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) that could fit into standard light sockets only hit the market in the 1980s, but the signs are their days may be numbered. GE has announced it will cease production of CFLs this year and instead switch its focus to producing LEDs.Read More

Materials

Graphene membrane makes for a more sensitive condenser microphone

Graphene's ever-growing list of remarkable properties has seen many wide-reaching potential applications for the wonder material proposed, but actual demonstrations of real-world uses are still thin on the ground. But that's slowly changing. Following a graphene-based light bulb headed for commercial release being revealed earlier this year, now scientists have developed a graphene-based condenser microphone that is more sensitive than its conventional cousins.Read More

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