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Darren Quick

Darren Quick
Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.
Top Articles by Darren Quick
A self-cleaning nanoparticle coating removes stains from cashmere using light (Photo: Shut...

Cashmere is a fine quality wool whose delicate nature generally means a trip to the dry cleaner is required to deal with any stains on an article of clothing made from the material. But now researchers at City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a self-cleaning coating made up of nanoparticles that removes stains from cashmere by exposing the garment to light.  Read More

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) improved the memory of participants in a Northwest...

Failing memory is one of the (many) drawbacks of old age, but can also impact younger people suffering stroke, early-stage Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury and cardiac arrest. In a breakthrough that opens up the potential for new treatments for memory impairments in the young and old, researchers at Northwestern University have shown that electrical stimulation of the brain can improve memory, with the benefits lasting long after treatment.  Read More

Researchers have found that common gut bacteria prevent sensitization to peanut allergens ...

As someone who almost shuffled off this mortal coil after downing a satay, I'm always hopeful when potential breakthroughs for the treatment of food allergies arise. The latest cause for hope, which could one day let food allergy sufferers order in restaurants without worrying about potentially life-threatening ingredients hidden within, comes from scientists at the University of Chicago Medicine, who have found that a common gut bacteria protects against food allergies in mice.  Read More

A new system developed at Princeton University allows diabetics to check blood glucose lev...

Finger-prick tests to monitor blood glucose levels can be the bane of a diabetic's life. In a move that could put an end to such tests in the future, researchers at Princeton University have developed a non-invasive way to test blood glucose levels using a laser.  Read More

LG's Bluetooth MiniBeam projector can project images measuring from 25 to 100 in (63.5 to ... Smartphones and tablets have made it easier than ever to enjoy a little video entertainment wherever we may find ourselves. But in recent years we've seen projectors shrink down to a size that allows those that crave a larger display to effectively carry one around with them. The latest to join the list is LG's Bluetooth MiniBeam projector.  Read More

A K-MAX unmanned helicopter autonomously delivering an SMSS by sling load as part of a fir...

While aircraft such as the X-47B are paving the way for unmanned aircraft filling combat roles, autonomous aircraft are also being developed to tackle more mundane – but still dangerous – military operations. To this end, the first fully autonomous resupply, reconnaissance, surveillance and target-acquisition demonstration using the Squad Mission Support System (SMSS) unmanned ground vehicle, K-MAX unmanned helicopter and Gyrocam optical sensor was recently conducted at Fort Benning, Georgia.  Read More

The tattoo biosensor for monitoring lactate levels that has been converted into a sweat-po...

Last year, researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) unveiled a sensor imprinted on a temporary tattoo that, when applied to the skin, is able to continuously monitor lactate levels in a person's sweat as they exercise. Now the research team has leveraged the technology to create a biobattery powered by perspiration that could lead to small electronic devices being powered by sweat.  Read More

An algorithm developed at Disney Research is able to take footage of an event captured fro...

These days, with most people toting camera-packing smartphones, friends and families act as a veritable film crew, ready to capture important moments from a multitude of angles. But editing the footage into a cohesive whole can be a time-consuming chore. Now a team at Disney Research has developed an algorithm that automatically edits hours of raw footage into something less tedious to sit through.  Read More

Researchers at the Salk Institute have found that the FGF1 protein shows promise for the d...

There are numerous research efforts underway to develop new treatments and improve the lives of people suffering type 2 diabetes, whose ranks have increased dramatically in recent decades due in large part to the so-called obesity epidemic. A new generation of safer and more effective diabetes drugs could be in the offing with researchers at the Salk Institute discovering that when mice with diet-induced diabetes were given a single injection of a protein, their blood sugar levels were restored to a healthy range for more than two days.  Read More

DTU researchers have set a new data transmission record of 43 Tbps over optical fiber (Pho...

Using a new type of optical fiber, researchers at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) have transmitted data over a single optical fiber at a speed of 43 terabits per second (43 Tbps) to set a new data transmission world record. This beats the previous record of 32 Tbps set by researchers at Germany's Karlsruhe Institute of Technology.  Read More

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