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Dario Borghino

Dario Borghino

Dario studied software engineering at the Polytechnic University of Turin. When he isn't writing for Gizmag he is usually traveling the world on a whim, working on an AI-guided automated trading system, or chasing his dream to become the next European thumbwrestling champion.

— Electronics

iKlips dual flash drive for iPhones, iPads, Macs and PCs is faster than the rest

By - March 30, 2015 7 Pictures
Moving media between iOS devices for sharing or backup storage can be a hassle, especially without an internet connection. The iKlips, the first dual (USB and Lightning) flash drive to feature a USB 3.0 connector, promises to make things easier (and faster than the competition) by offering a faster, more convenient way to store and exchange files between iOS devices, Macs and PCs. Read More
— Space Feature

Searching for the origins of life with the James Webb Space Telescope

Hubble has been a boon to deep space exploration, gifting us iconic pictures of the skies and revealing new insights into the history of the early universe. For the next big step in space astronomy, NASA, ESA and the Canadian Space Agency are raising the stakes even higher with one of their most ambitious projects in decades: building the largest space telescope ever ... the James Webb Space Telescope. Read More
— Environment

Modular biobattery plant turns a wide range of biomass into energy

By - March 1, 2015
Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute have developed a "biobattery" in the form of a highly efficient biogas plant that can turn raw materials like straw, scrap wood and sludge into a variety of useful energy sources including electricity, purified gas and engine oil. The new plant design, currently being put to the test in a prototype plant in Germany, is said to be highly modular and economically viable even at the small scale. Read More
— Science

High-performance flow battery could rival lithium-ions for EVs and grid storage

By - February 27, 2015 2 Pictures
A new redox flow battery developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) more than doubles the amount of energy that this type of cell can pack in a given volume, approaching the numbers of lithium-ion batteries. If the device reaches mass production, it could find use in fast-charging transportation, portable electronics and grid storage. Read More
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