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Chris Wood

Chris Wood

Chris specializes in mobile technology for Gizmag, but also likes to dabble in the latest gaming gadgets. He has a degree in Politics and Ancient History from the University of Exeter, and lives in Gloucestershire, UK. In his spare time you might find him playing music, following a variety of sports or binge watching Game of Thrones.

— Medical

Odoreader accurately detects prostate cancer from urine

Standard prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests for prostate cancer are far from ideal, sometimes resulting in unnecessary biopsies, and even failing to detect some cancers altogether. With the goal of developing a more capable alternative, a team of researchers has turned to a machine it calls the Odoreader, which is designed to analyze urine samples to provide a non-invasive prostate cancer test.

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— Health & Wellbeing

Dangerous bacteria molecules discovered in processed foods

Everyone knows that processed foods aren't exactly good for the human body, but a new study by researchers at the University of Leicester has shed more light on exactly why that's the case. The scientists have detected dangerous molecules called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which are linked to numerous conditions, including Type 2 diabetes. Perhaps most interestingly, it is believed that the dangerous molecules could potentially be removed without impacting cost or taste.

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— Medical

Machine-learning robot could streamline drug development

Testing out newly developed drugs is an extremely time-consuming process, and it can be difficult to get right. Now, a team of scientists at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) is working to streamline the task, creating a robotically driven experimentation system that's able to reduce the number of tests that have to be carried out by as much as 70 percent.

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— Medical

Genomic signature could lead to new early-detection cancer test

Detecting cancer when it's still in the early stages of development is a difficult task, but an extremely important one, with the chances of effective treatment being much higher the quicker it's caught. Now, a team of researchers from the National Institute of Health (NIH) has identified a signature of tumor DNA that occurs, and is detectable, in five different cancers – a discovery that could lead to a simple early detection blood test.

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— Health & Wellbeing

Natural clay found to kill deadly bacteria

A global effort is under way to find effective treatments for deadly hospital-acquired infections, with many such dangerous bacteria proving worryingly resistant to antibiotics. Now, help may have been found in the most unlikely of places, with researchers finding positive results when studying an old folk remedy – natural Canadian clay.

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— Medical

Cultured liver cell microreactor might replace animal testing

Finding alternatives to animal testing is an important endeavor. While the practice has been banned in the cosmetic products industry since 2013, it's still a central part of evaluating the effectiveness and dangers of new medication, with researchers usually using laboratory rodents to test out their latest drugs. Now, a team lead by scientists at Germany's Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology has created a microbioreactor that has the potential to provide medication testing using cultured liver cells rather than animals.

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— Medical

Improved DNA tech could replace antibodies in detecting and treating diseases

A team of researchers from the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology at the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) has worked to develop an efficient technology that uses DNA to detect and treat infectious diseases. Improving upon an existing method, the research makes use of single-stranded DNA molecules called aptamers, and it could be used to treat cancer.

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