Advertisement

Chris Wood

Environment

Seismic vibrations provide a new, accurate way to monitor ice sheet decline

We currently measure changes in ice sheets via data gathered by missions such as NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite, or by flying planes over a region and using lasers to map topography. But there could be a better way, with a team of researchers, led by scientists at MIT, getting positive results from a new method that tracks seismic vibrations caused by ocean waves to measure changes in ice volume.Read More

Medical

Non-invasive device monitors diabetes using microwaves

For diabetics, keeping track of blood sugar can be a drag, with Type 1 sufferers having to monitor their levels as much as six times a day. A new device might make life significantly easier, providing a non-invasive solution for tracking glucose levels, without the need to extract blood.Read More

Medical

Starving cancer cells of nutrients halts tumour growth

There are more than 900 different types of cancer currently identified, and many of them require very specific treatments, and can become resistant to chemotherapy as time goes on. Now, researchers at the Australian National University (ANU) have made a potentially huge breakthrough, working out how to cut off the supply of vital nutrients to cancer cells. The work opens the door to future treatments that could be less prone to resistance than many current methods, and could work across with a wide range of cancers.Read More

Medical

The best recipe for 3D-printed replacement bones

Facial and head surgery can require sections of bone to be removed, and doctors often have to harvest material from elsewhere in the body to fill in the gaps. That's not always an ideal situation, and can lead to complications. New research coming out of the Johns Hopkins University could provide an alternative, creating custom-made, 3D-printed implants from a mixture of plastic and bone powder.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Labradors' genes are to blame for their chubbiness

Labradors have a reputation for being obsessed with food, and in turn, they have a tendency to become obese more than a lot of other canines. Well, new research suggests that the trait is actually the result of a genetic variation that's particularly common in the breed – and the finding could lead to better treatments for human obesity.Read More

Medical

Add-ons let iPhones perform anterior and retinal eye exams

Visual impairment and blindness is an extremely widespread issue that affects an estimated 285 million people across the globe, with nine of out of 10 cases occurring in developing regions. oDocs Eye Care is hoping to put a dent in those numbers, producing low-cost, portable eye examination accessories designed to harness the power of the iPhone.Read More

Medical

Robot-driven CT scanner can image standing, conscious horses

Traditional CT scanners require the patient to lay down and stay perfectly still in a narrow tube within an imposing-looking machine. It's a daunting experience, and while it's workable for human patients, it's not well suited to large animals like horses. A project taking place at the University of Pennsylvania is looking to completely change how we go about performing the scans in such cases, using two robotic arms that move around the horse while it's upright and conscious.Read More

3D Printing

The most popular 3D printing pen gets a makeover – meet the 3Doodler Create

It's been a couple of years since we first tried out the 3Doodler – a pen that lets you draw in three dimensions using molten plastic that hardens when it comes into contact with the air. Since then, we've seen a revised version of the product hit shelves, and now the company is back again with yet another refinement – the 3Doodler Create. The new pen brings improved reliability and some cool new design elements. Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning

    Advertisement