Decision time? Read Gizmag's latest product comparisons

Ben Coxworth

A sample of the hydrogel turns from blue to green to red, as it takes up glucose

Thanks to a new color-changing hydrogel, there may soon be a more reliable way of continuously monitoring the blood glucose levels of both diabetics and hospital patients. If incorporated into a device such as an implanted pump, it could automatically trigger the release of insulin into the bloodstream as needed.  Read More

The Hank Direct Bike offers an alternative to traditional folding bikes ... and to chains ...

Folding bicycles definitely have an advantage when it comes to easy toting and storage, although their chain presents a design challenge – it can’t just be folded sideways along with the frame, and there’s a risk that it will transfer gunk onto the rider’s clothing as they’re carrying the bike. Korean manufacturer Bygen has devised a solution, in the form of its Hank Direct Bike. Instead of a chain or belt drive, it has levers that transfer power from the pedals to the rear wheel.  Read More

Spheree presents 3D models in a fish bowl-like display, which responds to changes in the v...

Although viewing a 3D digital model of an item allows you get a sense of the "real" object, it certainly doesn’t help if you’re looking at that three-dimensional model on a flat screen. That’s why Spheree was created. The result of a collaboration between a group of Brazilian and Canadian universities, it’s a spherical display that users can walk around, viewing a model from various angles as if the object were physically in front of them.  Read More

Members of the VALERI Project, with an early omniRob prototype

In the automotive industry, life is pretty easy for the car-assembling robots ... they just sit in the same place performing the same task, day after day. Things are different in the aerospace industry, however. Airplanes aren’t made on assembly lines, so any robots used in their construction would have to move around them. The member organizations of the European VALERI Project (Validation of Advanced, Collaborative Robotics for Industrial Applications) are now working on making such mobile, autonomous plane-building robots a reality.  Read More

Orgenesis' approach involves harvesting the patient's own liver cells and converting them ...

When pancreatic islet allo-transplantation therapy was first introduced, it provided hope for countless diabetics tired of daily insulin injections. While the technology has delivered on much of its promise, Tel Aviv-based regenerative medicine firm Orgenesis is currently developing a treatment of its own, that it claims addresses much of the shortcomings of islet therapy. In a nutshell, its approach involves converting the patient’s own liver cells into cells that produce insulin.  Read More

Wingfoot One takes to the skies Last July, we first heard about Goodyear’s plans to replace its current fleet of blimps with newer, more advanced models. The first of those airships, which was unnamed at the time, made its maiden flight this March. Now called Wingfoot One, it officially began active service last Friday.  Read More

The Towter Transporter can reportedly be towed by any vehicle equipped with a standard tra...

When someone has a powered wheelchair that needs to be transported, the purchase of a wheelchair-accessible van is often required. Canadian inventor Len Wideman, however, doesn’t think that people should have to go to such an extreme. That’s why he created the Towter Transporter. It’s a climate-controlled trailer that’s designed for the easy loading and unloading of wheelchairs, and it can be towed by any standard-hitch-equipped vehicle.  Read More

Watching the fun at AstaZero

It seems like hardly a week goes by without our hearing about another automated safety feature for cars. Such technologies include systems that detect when drivers are getting tired, that allow multiple cars to safely travel together in speed-controlled "convoys," or that warn drivers when they're drifting out of their lane. Now, in order to help foster the development of more such concepts, a new Swedish test-track facility has begun operations.  Read More

By measuring a plastic item's fluorescence half-life, it's possible to tell what kind of p... If you've ever had to separate different types of plastic for recycling, then you'll know how much it slows down the recycling process. Now, imagine how much harder it is for staff receiving huge amounts of unsorted plastic at municipal recycling plants. New technology developed at Ludwig Maximilians Universitat in Munich, however, identifies plastic types automatically.  Read More

A green anole, that has regrown the end of its tail

If you ever had a pet lizard as a child, it was quite likely a green anole. As is the case with other lizards, they have the ability to break off their own tail when attacked by a predator, and then regrow it. Scientists from Arizona State University recently announced that they have cracked the code regarding that tail regrowth process, and are now hoping that it could be applied to the field of regenerative medicine.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 28,702 articles