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Ben Coxworth

The design of the Rungu was inspired by trying to transport surfboards across the sand

With their huge, soft tires that allow them to "float" over snow and sand, fatbikes have experienced a surge in popularity over the past few years. Last December, British adventurer Maria Leijerstam took things a step further, using a custom fat trike to ride to the South Pole. Now, California-based Standard Bearer Machines is offering a fat-trike of its own, known as the Rungu.  Read More

The new coating protects airplane engine components from heat damage, while lasting longer...

The higher the temperature at which an aircraft engine is able to run, the more efficiently it uses fuel. In order to run at those high temperatures, the metal components of airplane engines are presently treated with heat-shielding coatings. Scientists at Sweden's University West, however, are developing a new such coating that is said to be far more effective than anything presently used – it could extend the service life of engines by 300 percent.  Read More

The MicrobeScope is a mini microscope designed for use with the iPhone

We've seen devices that let you attach your smartphone to a microscope, but they require you to have access to a microscope in the first place. What if you don't? Well, that's where the MicrobeScope comes in. It's a portable 800x microscope that works with newer iPhones – or just with the naked eye.  Read More

MIT's Daniela Rus and Andrew Marchese with their sharp-turning robotic fish

Anyone who has ever tried to grab a minnow out of the water knows that it's almost impossible. Not only can they swim forward very quickly, but they can also make near-instantaneous right-angle turns, unpredictably shooting off to one side or the other in mere milliseconds. Now, scientists at MIT have replicated that capability in a soft-bodied robotic fish.  Read More

NAHBS 2014 featured over 150 exhibitors from around the world

Ask someone to list off the world's most innovative bicycles, and chances are that they'll mention some mass-produced bikes made by big-name manufacturers. The fact is, though, it's more often the smaller, independent builders that are doing the real innovating. For the past 10 years, many of them have been showing off their latest builds at the North American Handmade Bicycle Show (NAHBS). We attended this year's event, which took place last weekend in Charlotte, North Carolina. Here's a look at some of the things that really caught our eye.  Read More

The Joint Light Tactical Vehicle is one of the suggested recipients of the polyfibroblast ...

According to the US Department of Defense, corrosion costs the Navy approximately US$7 billion every year. That's certainly an incentive for developing a method of keeping military vehicles from rusting. Now, researchers from the Office of Naval Research and The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory may be onto something. They're looking into the use a powder that could allow scratched or chipped paint to "heal like human skin."  Read More

A rendering of one of the two-dimensional LEDs In regular microchips, work is performed via the movement of electrons within the chip. Thanks to the recent creation of the thinnest-ever LEDs, however, such chips may one day be able to use light instead of electrons, saving power and reducing heat. Of course, those LEDs could also just be used as a really flat form of lighting, in any number of applications.  Read More

The tubing in this frame may look like it's made from regular ol' bamboo ... but it isn't

It wasn't that long ago that bamboo-framed bikes were thought of as a weird rarity. Thanks to its combination of durability, stiffness and vibration-damping characteristics, however, the material has been gaining popularity in recent years. That being said, some designers still find that the random nature of pure bamboo makes it a little too unpredictable for producing frames of a consistent character and quality. That's why two frame builders have developed some interesting work-arounds.  Read More

Gizmag tries out the Fix It Sticks Replaceable Edition

Last September, we heard about a new cycling multitool known as Fix it Sticks. A successful Kickstarter project, it consists of two aluminum "sticks" that can be joined together to form a T wrench, with a different type of bit permanently attached to each end. At the time, several readers complained that the bits should be interchangeable. Well, those people will be happy to learn that the designer has now come out with the Fix It Sticks Replaceable Edition. We got to try one out, and can attest to the fact that it's a gooder.  Read More

The Darwin prototype on display

When you want to climb or sprint on your bike, what do you do? That's right, you get your butt off the saddle and shift your weight forward. According to Tampa-based inventor Felton Zimmerman, however, going off-saddle like that hampers your performance. His solution? The Darwin Bicycle. It features a folding frame that automatically moves the saddle forward with you, so you're always seated.  Read More

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