Top 100: The most desirable cars of all time

Ben Coxworth

A rendering of a 3.7 micron-wide 'microbullet' hitting a sheet of graphene, which deforms ...

While graphene is already known for being the world's strongest material, most studies have focused on its tensile strength – that's the maximum stress that it can withstand while being pulled or stretched, before failing. According to studies conducted at Houston's Rice University, however, its ability to absorb sudden impacts hadn't previously been thoroughly explored. As it turns out, the material is 10 times better than steel at dissipating kinetic energy. That could make it an excellent choice for lightweight ballistic body armor.  Read More

Bygen's Hank Direct Bike features a one-of-a-kind drivetrain along with a telescoping fram...

Bicycle historians, take note – it's time once again to look back at 10 of the bike-related products that most caught our attention over the past year! As with our lists from 2012 and 2013, these aren't necessarily things that we think are destined to be big sellers. In fact, it's entirely possible that this might be the last you hear of many of them. We like 'em, though, because they're examples of what happens when people dare to try something different ... and that sort of spirit is the reason why we're not still all riding penny farthings.  Read More

The SoloShot2 pans and tilts the user's camera, to follow them while they're in action

A couple of years ago, we first heard about the SoloShot. It's a robotic device that sits between a video camera and a tripod, automatically panning the camera to keep the surfing, skiing, etc subject centered in the shot. The idea is that you can get video of yourself doin' your thing, without calling upon someone else to act as a videographer. The SoloShot2 takes things a step further, most notably by also tilting the camera.  Read More

The NVC case has its own infrared camera and LEDs

We're now well within the midst of a gold rush, when it comes to smartphone cases that "do things." Recent examples include models that shoot pepper spray, serve as health monitors, and double as game controllers. The Raspberry Pi-based NVC (Night Vision Camera) case, however, has its own trick up its sleeve – it lets the iPhone 6 see in the dark.  Read More

The Wolf headlight puts out 165 lumens – and can be detected by another rider's Wolf tail ...

Today's LED bicycle tail lights are brighter than ever, which is great when it comes to being seen by motorists. If you're riding right behind another cyclist using such a device, however, its high-intensity output can be blinding. That's why Australian cycling tech firm Augur created Wolf lights. They communicate with one another, and dim to avoid dazzling their users.  Read More

Bontrager's TLR Flash Charger pump Tubeless tires are pretty much standard on higher-end mountain bikes now, due to their lower weight and rolling resistance, along with their ability to contain sealant. However, they do have one drawback – you need to use a CO2 cartridge or an air compressor to put the things on. Bontrager has set out to change that, with its TLR Flash Charger pump.  Read More

The Carbon Flyer tips the scales at 1.5 oz (42.5 g)

If you like the idea of remotely-piloting a paper airplane, then you really out to check out the PowerUp 3.0 – it's a motor/prop/rudder kit that you add to an existing paper plane, allowing you to control it via a smartphone app. Should you like your R/C aircraft a little techier and sturdier, however, Trident Design's Carbon Flyer might be more to your liking. It has the form factor of a paper plane, but features carbon fiber construction, LED running lights, and an onboard video camera.  Read More

The robotic walker moves with the user, instead of keeping them confined to a treadmill

It can be a laborious business, teaching people such as victims of strokes or brain injuries to walk again. Often, multiple physiotherapists are required to hold patients up while they walk on a treadmill, while also manually moving their legs to achieve the proper gait. Soon, however, a robotic walker developed at the National University of Singapore could make the process considerably easier.  Read More

MagLOCK pedals retain the rider's shoes using embedded magnets

So-called "clipless" bicycle pedals, in which a steel cleat in the sole of the rider's shoe clicks in and out of a mechanism in the pedal, are very popular with cyclists – they maximize pedaling efficiency, plus they help keep riders' feet from accidentally slipping off the pedals when going over rough terrain. Some riders, however, find them too difficult to quickly snap out of. Additionally, they don't work well with regular, non-cleated footwear. That's why Salt Lake City-based mechanical engineer David Williams has created the MagLOCK bike pedal.  Read More

The Motus Sleeve has been tested on nine Major League Baseball teams

You've probably heard about baseball pitchers "throwing their arm out." It's a common overuse injury, and typically involves damage to their elbow's ulnar collateral ligament (UCL). In order to help avoid such injuries, and to assist pitchers in assessing their performance, biomechanics tech company Motus Global is introducing its Motus Sleeve.  Read More

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