2015 Geneva Auto Show

Ben Coxworth

Tracky's top and pants incorporate 11 accelerometers, along with other sensors

When professional athletes are having their performance analyzed, it's certainly not unheard of for them to wear motion capture suits while training in a lab environment. Coaches and others can then analyze their movements, to see where improvements could be made. Indian startup ProjectPOLE is now offering that same feedback to everyday athletes, with its Tracky motion-tracking sportswear.  Read More

FlipCrown lets you do this with your handlebars If you've ever gotten snagged against a bicycle parked in a cramped space, chances are it was the handlebars that got you. FlipCrown is designed to keep that from happening, by allowing cyclists to flip their bars sideways when they park their bike.  Read More

Two Snolo Scions, ready to hit the slopes

Back in 2012, we first heard about the Stealth-X carbon fiber sled. Designed by New Zealand-based company Snolo, it was designed to be fast, light and maneuverable. Unfortunately for most of us, it also cost US$2,999. Now, however, Snolo is ready to begin production on a much more affordable plastic version of the sled, known as the Scion.  Read More

The fishing boat, with its four chambers visible at the front

An old fishing trawler has been given new life in Norway, where it's now anchored offshore in the Stadthavet area and serving as a wave power plant. It's part of a project which ultimately calls for larger, purpose-built vessels to convert wave motion into electricity.  Read More

VRide Multi displays the identity, speed and location of other online users, layered over ...

If you don't like cycling alone on a trainer all winter, you might be interested in Zwift or ebove. Both of these systems let indoor cyclists "virtually" ride on animated roads or trails, along with other cyclists who join them via the internet and appear as avatars. Perhaps, however, that computer-generated scenery just isn't cutting it for you. In that case, VeloReality’s VRide Multi may be more to your liking. It's similar to those other multi-player systems, but it uses actual HD first-person video shot on various scenic roads around the world.  Read More

The Cirin rubber band racer (Photo: Max Greenberg)

When you were a kid, did you ever have one of those toy race cars that was powered by a wound-up rubber band? If you did, chances are it wasn't quite as striking as Cirin. Modeled after mid-1950s Formula 1 cars, the one-off mini racer features state-of-the-art construction, and 16 ft (5 m) of looped elastic that allows it to travel 500 ft (152 m) at speeds of up to 30 mph (48 km/h).  Read More

The octopus-inspired device, inflated and ready to go

When you inflate a balloon and then release it without tying the valve shut, it certainly shoots away quickly. Octopi utilize the same basic principle, although they suck in and then rapidly expel water. An international team of scientists have now replicated that system in a soft-bodied miniature underwater vehicle, which could pave the way for very quickly-accelerating full-size submersibles.  Read More

A simplified illustration of the nanowafer (Image: ACS)

As anyone who has ever used medicinal eyedrops will know, it's hard to get the things into your own eye. Soon, however, they could be replaced by tiny drug-containing polymer "nanowafers" that are applied to the eye like a contact lens. Those wafers would proceed to gradually dissolve, releasing medication throughout the day.  Read More

The micro-flyer scouts the hallways of the USS Shadwell (Photo: CMU)

This week, the US Office of Naval Research released details regarding a demo of its Shipboard Autonomous Firefighting Robot (SAFFiR) conducted last November. The robot, as its name implies, is designed to help human crews fight fires in the close confines of naval vessels. In order to get to those fires quicker, SAFFiR may ultimately receive some help itself from an autonomous drone, that was also part of the demonstration.  Read More

Fluid is ratcheted through a gap between the pump's teeth (Image: B. Thiria & J. Zhang)

In most pumps, either a spinning impeller pulls liquid in and then essentially "throws" it out via centrifugal force, or a rotor draws it through using peristaltic force. After studying how birds' flapping wings use fluid dynamics to push air back while moving the animals forward, however, two scientists from New York University have developed a pump that works in yet another fashion – and it has teeth.  Read More

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