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Ben Coxworth

The Monaco V4 Tourbillon on display at Baselworld 2014

Ten years ago, TAG Heuer unveiled its Monaco V4 Concept Watch, which was the world's first watch to incorporate belt drives, linear mass and ball bearings. In 2009, the watchmaker released the production version, simply called the Monaco V4. At Baselworld 2014, we recently spied the latest incarnation, the Monaco V4 Tourbillon. It's reportedly the first watch to ever feature a belt-drive tourbillon complication.  Read More

The XPrize Foundation wants to find out if an artificial intelligence can compose and deli...

TED Talks are known for being delivered in a captivating, compelling fashion – that's why the events' organizers are fairly picky when it comes to selecting speakers. With that in mind, XPrize has teamed up with TED for its latest competition, in which an artificial intelligence (AI) must deliver a TED Talk with no human assistance.  Read More

An MIT rendering of a bacterial cell, trailing fibers containing gold nanoparticles and qu... Scientists at MIT are developing hybrid materials that are a cross between living bacterial cells and non-living components such as gold nanoparticles or quantum dots. The resulting "living materials" are able to respond to their environment like regular living cells, while also doing things like conducting electricity or emitting light.  Read More

Samples of the coating, which contains dyes that make bacteria die

Hospital-acquired infections are a major health threat, and have prompted the development of preventative measures incorporating things like blue light and selenium nanoparticles. One of the latest such developments is a light-activated antimicrobial surface coating made from silicone, dye and gold. For some reason, it also works in the absence of light.  Read More

The mini heart takes the form of a cuff of cardiac tissue, wrapped around a vein

When someone has chronic venous insufficiency, it means that because of faulty valves in their leg veins, oxygen-poor blood isn't able to be pumped back to their heart. The George Washington University's Dr. Narine Sarvazyan has created a possible solution, however – a beating "mini heart" that's wrapped around the vein, to help push the blood through.  Read More

LaserEyes in 'burning mode' Last year, German laser weapons hobbyist Patrick Priebe built a working replica of Ironman's laser gauntlet. Now, he's paid another visit to the world of superheroes, creating his own take on the "energy beam"-emitting eyewear worn by the X-Men's Cyclops.  Read More

A demonstration of how the phosphorus-laden particles can be removed from water using a ma... Phosphorus is a mineral that's widely used in fertilizer, which itself has an unfortunate tendency to leach out of farmers' fields and into our waterways. Now, researchers from Germany's Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research have devised a method of retrieving some of that phosphorus from the water – thus both reducing pollution, and providing a source of reclaimed phosphorus.  Read More

It may someday be possible to ascertain someone's appearance by analyzing their DNA

As any fan of just about any TV cop show will tell you, it's possible to determine someone's sex and race based on a sample of their DNA. In the future, however, such samples may provide police with even more valuable information ... they might allow investigators to construct an image of the person's face.  Read More

The StratoBus will hover up out of the way of airliners, but won't need to be launched int...

Satellites may be very useful for communications, navigation and other applications, but they're awfully expensive to build and launch, and once they're in orbit ... well, there's no reusing them. That's why a consortium led by Thales Alenia Space is developing the StratoBus. It's a planned autonomous airship that can be launched like a regular blimp, but that will be able to hover at an altitude of 20 km (12 miles) – that's up in the stratosphere, hence the name.  Read More

The three young inventors of the Pluvia system, which uses rainwater runoff to generate el... When we complain about the rain, other people will often say "Yeah, but it's good for the plants." Well, thanks to a microturbine-based system created by three students from the Technological University of Mexico, it's now also being used to generate electricity for use in low-income homes.  Read More

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