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Ben Coxworth

A GermFalcon prototype makes its way down an airliner's aisle (Photo: GermFalcon)

Airliner cabins can get pretty germy. They're packed full of people from all over the world, who spend hours doing things like coughing, sneezing and touching surfaces with their grubby li'l hands. It was with this in mind that Arthur Kreitenberg and his son Mo created the GermFalcon. It's a robot that kills germs on planes, using ultraviolet light.  Read More

The galloping Mechanical Horse, caught in motion (Photo: Adrian Landon) As a child, Brooklyn-based metal sculptor Adrian Landon played with Lego a lot. He also learned about horses from his polo-playing dad, who in turn learned about them from his father, who was an equine veterinarian. That background set the stage for Landon's latest work of art, a stainless steel life-size Mechanical Horse that gallops in slow motion at the press of a button.  Read More

The Phantom Series II-based engineering mule is being used to develop Project Cullinan's A... Back in February, Rolls-Royce announced its plans to manufacture an SUV ... or more specifically, "a vehicle that can cross any terrain." While we're still waiting to see what that vehicle will look like, the automaker has provided photos of the first "engineering mule" that it's using to develop the necessary all-wheel drive suspension system.  Read More

DJI's new Phantom 3 Professional

Last November, DJI Innovations released the Inspire 1 drone, which was unlike anything the company had manufactured before. Today, though, the company announced the latest step in the evolution of its more familiar and affordable Phantom line – namely, the Phantom 3. There are actually two models, the Phantom 3 Professional and slightly-less-fancy Phantom 3 Advanced.  Read More

The Rivet definitely has a look of its own

We've seen some pretty eye-catching motorcycles in recent months, including a Tron light cycle replica, the exotic Feline One, and the quirky Dryvtech 2x2x2. That said, all of those bikes have one glaring shortcoming – none of them were co-designed by William Shatner. The actor who brought us the character of Captain James T. Kirk is, however, one of the creative forces behind the limited-edition Rivet. And judging by what he's told us, he's pretty proud of it.  Read More

One of the drones used in the study (Photo: University of Zurich)

When it comes to concerns about the widespread use of drones, one of the big ones is the worry that the things will crash on peoples' heads. That's why researchers at the University of Zurich have created a system to keep that from happening. Their technology allows a drone to regain stable flight after losing control, and to autonomously land in a "safe" area in the event of mechanical or battery failure.  Read More

A sample of the burn-healing biomaterial

In the not-too-distant future, burn victims may be able to recover in the half the time than is possible today. If so, it will be thanks to a biodegradable dressing that applies cultured skin cells directly to the wound site.  Read More

The Halfbike II hits the boardwalk Last year, architects Mihail Klenov and Martin Angelov introduced the world to their Halfbike. Its quirkiness apparently struck a chord with a lot of people, as it was successfully funded on Kickstarter. Now, they're raising funds for the new-and-improved Halfbike II.  Read More

Algae grows in pools of wastewater in Houston, Texas (Photo: Rice University)

Algae may indeed be a potential source of biofuel, but it can also find use in things like nutritional supplements and cosmetics. When it's grown commercially, its growth is usually aided with chemical fertilizers. The cost of those chemicals cuts into the profits, however, plus the fertilizers are also needed for more traditional crops. That's why scientists from Houston's Rice University are looking into growing algae in municipal wastewater – the water would already contain its own free fertilizer, plus the algae would help clean it up.  Read More

The Closca Fuga in its flat (left) and on-the-head states Bike helmets take up a lot of room in a bag, which is why we've already seen ones that can be folded like an accordion, a taco, or an armadillo. Closca Design's Fuga, however, takes yet another approach – it telescopes down from the top.  Read More

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