Photokina 2014 highlights

Ben Coxworth

Using the RM-LVR2V Live-View Remote, users can remotely preview, play back and delete shot...

And you thought Sony’s existing Action Cam was small ... Today at the IFA 2014 electronics trade show in Germany, Sony introduced its Action Cam Mini. By moving the GPS function out of the camera and into an accompanying wrist-mounted remote, the company has shrunk the camera to two-thirds the size of its predecessor.  Read More

The energy-harvesting device, attached to a pig's heart

Although cardiac pacemakers have saved countless lives, they do have at least one shortcoming – like other electronic devices, their batteries wear out. When this happens, of course, surgery is required in order to replace the pacemaker. While some researchers are looking into ideas such as drawing power from blood sugar, Swiss scientists from the University of Bern have taken another approach. They’ve developed a wristwatch-inspired device that can power a pacemaker via the beating of the patient’s own heart.  Read More

Scott's ITD ProTec fabric incorporates strands of carbon fiber and a matrix of ceramic dot...

If you frequently ride a bike on asphalt, then it’s entirely possible that sooner or later you’re going to wipe out and end up with some nasty skin abrasions. While such "road rash" can occur just about anywhere on the body, the shoulders and hips are particularly prone to it, as they’re the parts of the body upon which cyclists quite often end up sliding across the road. In order to help protect those areas, Scott Sports has announced a new line of cycling clothing made to protect against road rash ... with a little help from ceramics and carbon fiber.  Read More

Dryve shields cyclists from raindrops – or at least, from the ones coming straight at them... Nobody likes getting rained on while cycling, yet most of us probably aren’t quite ready to shell out for an enclosed velomobile, either. That’s why Swiss company Allnew recently introduced Dryve – it’s a flexible, detachable rain cover for bikes.  Read More

Nasal septum cartilage cells can easily be coaxed into reproducing, providing a patient wi...

Depending on the part of the body and the nature of the injury, cartilage either doesn’t grow back at all, or does so very slowly. That’s why joint injuries often take a long time to heal, to the point that scientists are looking into using things like hydrogels and 3D printers to help speed the process. Now, however, researchers from Switzerland’s University of Basel are reporting that cartilage cells harvested from a patient’s own nose can be used to grow replacement cartilage for their knee.  Read More

The Schiller X1 in action

Last year, US entrepreneur Judah Schiller crossed San Francisco Bay on a bike – and no, he didn’t ride that bike across the Golden Gate Bridge. Instead, he mounted it on a Shuttle Bike kit, which adds pontoons and a propeller to a user-supplied bicycle. Since then, Judah has been working on designing an all-in-one "waterbike" of his own. The result, the Schiller X1, was officially unveiled this month.  Read More

Carbon black from tires reportedly makes a better anode material than the traditional grap...

There may soon be a new use for discarded tires ... besides turning them into mattresses for cows, that is. Researchers from the US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have devised a method of harvesting the carbon black from them, and using it to make anodes for better-performing lithium-ion batteries.  Read More

The MC2, ready to cruise

Well, another day, and another oddball transforming bicycle from Eurobike 2014. Yesterday, we took a look at the telescoping lever-drive Hank from Korea’s Bygen. Today, it’s the MC2 from Singapore-based IDSG Engineering and Trading. Designed by IDSG’s Jing Che and Quoc Bao Dang, its hinged frame allows it to be set into eight different configurations.  Read More

The implant measures internal optic pressure, excessive amounts of which can lead to loss ...

Currently, people with glaucoma must have their internal optic pressure (the pressure within their eye) regularly checked by a specialist. If that IOP gets too high, then steps need to be taken to lower it, before vision damage can occur. The problem is, the pressure can change quickly, potentially rising to dangerous levels between those checks. A new implant, however, could make it possible for patients to check their own IOP as often as they like, using their smartphone.  Read More

A sample of the hydrogel turns from blue to green to red, as it takes up glucose

Thanks to a new color-changing hydrogel, there may soon be a more reliable way of continuously monitoring the blood glucose levels of both diabetics and hospital patients. If incorporated into a device such as an implanted pump, it could automatically trigger the release of insulin into the bloodstream as needed.  Read More

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