Computational creativity and the future of AI

Ben Coxworth

Sawyer is designed to perform intricate tasks that are beyond the capabilities of other in...

It was three years ago that we first heard about Rethink Robotics' Baxter industrial robot. Priced at US$22,000 and requiring no programming expertise on the part of its users, it was intended to bring robotic automation to manufacturers who would otherwise not be able to afford it. Now, Rethink has announced the more compact and agile Sawyer robot.  Read More

Gizmag tries out the Quicklock – the commercial version will have a polished shackle (Phot...

The first time we ever heard about a padlock that can be unlocked by Bluetooth instead of a key or combination, it was the Noke by FŪZ Designs. While it won't be shipping until this June, however, SafeTech Products' similar Quicklock will begin doing so next week – reportedly becoming the world's first Bluetooth padlock to actually reach consumers. We recently had the chance to try out an engineering sample unit.  Read More

Each of the new T-REXes may not be one of a kind, but they will be one of just 20

It may seem hard to believe, but Campagna Motors' three-wheeled high-performance T-REX has been around for 20 years now. To mark the occasion, the Montreal-based company is producing a special 20th Anniversary edition of the vehicle. If you want one, though, you'd better act fast – only 20 are being made.  Read More

The Sahmurai Sword combines an automotive-style tire patch kit with handlebar plugs Tubeless tires have become pretty much standard on higher-end mountain bikes, thanks partly to the fact that they're able to self-seal small punctures. When it comes to larger holes, however, they need a little help. That's why award-winning South African competitive cyclist Stefan Sahm created the Sahmurai Sword.  Read More

The more-expensive Speed Metal version of the Subcraft, on display at Baselworld (Photo: C...

When it comes to mechanical watches, we're used to seeing ones with the traditional face and hands. Romain Jerome's new Subcraft, however, does things a little differently. It displays the hour laterally in photoluminescent digital-style numerals along one edge, while the minute is viewed on a disc on top.  Read More

The teeny-tiny drill, made with an Ultimaker 2 3D printer (Photo: Lance Abernethy) Should you ever feel the need to carefully bore a hole through the top layer of skin on your finger, there's now a drill that can do it. Using his Ultimaker 2 3D printer, Auckland, New Zealand maintenance engineer Lance Abernethy has created what is unofficially the world's smallest working power drill.  Read More

Don't throw that graphene away – its holes are proton-friendly (Image: University of Minne...

We already knew that graphene was a highly useful material, but just how useful is it? Well, it turns out that even defective graphene may be valuable. According to a team of mostly-American scientists, improperly-formed graphene could find use in next-generation fuel cells. Among other things, those cells might allow electric cars to be recharged in the amount of time that it currently takes to refuel a gas-burning vehicle.  Read More

The Litelok weighs less than a U-lock, yet is claimed to be as secure

It's kind of ironic that while many cyclists ride lightweight bikes, they still carry heavy-duty U-locks that weigh several pounds. In most cases, however, lighter cable locks can easily be defeated with a set of bolt cutters. That's why Prof. Neil Barron, a former aeronautical engineer, has created the Litelok. It's light and flexible like a cable lock, but reportedly stands up to over five minutes of attack from tools such as bolt cutters, jacks and hack saws.  Read More

One of the box-patterned geckos used in the study (Photo: James Cook University)

Usually when we hear about the properties of geckos being applied to human technology, it's the reptiles' sticky feet that are in question. Now, however, scientists in Australia are looking at the manner in which a particular type of gecko is able to stay clean. Their findings could pave the way for things like water-repelling electronics, or clothes that never need washing.  Read More

The heel of this boot is made from the experimental new material (Photo: Toronto Rehabilit...

At this time of year, people living in northern regions all over the world are faced with the same problem: icy sidewalks. Boots with otherwise grippy soles still slip, and spikes don't do well on stretches where there is no ice. Researchers from the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and the University of Toronto are developing what could be a better alternative, however – rubber soles with bits of glass embedded in them.  Read More

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