Shopping? Check out our latest product comparisons

Ben Coxworth

The miniature sledge-testing rig used in the study

In Egypt's tomb of Djehutihotep, a wall painting depicts someone pouring water into the sand in front of one of the sledges that hauled the blocks used in the construction of the pyramids. According to new research, they had a good reason for doing so – by wetting the sand, as little as half as much pulling force would have been required to move those sledges.  Read More

The harness is part of a system that also incorporates drones and robots (Photo: Alper Boz...

At disaster sites such as building collapses, it's not uncommon to see trained dogs being used to sniff out trapped survivors, often squeezing into areas that are inaccessible by human rescue workers. Now, thanks to a new "smart" harness, such dogs may be able to play an even bigger role, by gathering and relaying vital information on their surroundings.  Read More

An image shot from beneath the water's surface, before and after processing by Stella Mari...

It's a classic scene from many a war movie – a submarine's presence is given away by its periscope protruding through the surface of the water. If submariners want to see what's up there, however, they really have no choice ... although that may be about to change. Scientists at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have devised a system that allows an underwater camera to look up through the surface from below, with a minimum of distortion.  Read More

'Test sausages' used in the development of the antimicrobial film

In recent years, we've heard about bacteria-killing food packaging materials that incorporate sorbic acid, silver, and montmorillonite clay. One of the latest such developments along those lines is a film that protects meat from spoilage using essential oils or nanoparticles. Additionally, because the film is edible, it could even be incorporated right into meat products.  Read More

A water sample being added to a vial for testing, using one of the new pills

Wondering if it's safe to drink the water from your remote village's well? Typically, the only way of finding out involves sending a sample of that water off to a lab, or using testing agents that must be shipped in and kept on dry ice. Now, however, scientists from Canada's McMaster University have developed simple pills that can do the job – and they were inspired by breath-freshening strips.  Read More

The polymer film changes in color from blue to red as pressure is applied

Whether you're manufacturing cars, phones, sports equipment or pretty much anything else, a key part of the design process involves measuring the amount of mechanical stress experienced by different parts of the product. Thanks to research being conducted at the University of California, Riverside, doing so may soon be much easier. Scientists there have created a film that changes color when subjected to pressure, making it easy to see where objects coated with the film may need reinforcement.  Read More

Sleevely keeps track of when and how much your baby is eating, and advises you accordingly...

Among the many questions that new parents have regarding the care of their baby, one of the most common has got to be "How much should we be feeding them?". Of course, that brings up another question, namely "How much are they eating?". The Tel Aviv-based designers of Sleevely claim that their product can provide the answers. It's a "SmartSleeve" that an existing baby bottle slides into, which monitors the infant's nutritional intake.  Read More

The BKON Craft Brewer – coming soon to a tea room near you?

As any serious tea-drinker knows, there's only a small window of time in which brewed tea is at its best. Pour it too soon, and it will be weak. Wait too long, and it will be bitter. The BKON company, however, is aiming to change that. Its BKON Craft Brewer is designed to produce perfectly-brewed cups of tea on demand, within one minute.  Read More

The 2Play's twin hulls are able to move up and down relative to the deck

Water may seem soft enough when you're in a bathtub full of the stuff, but as anyone who has smacked across the waves in a speeding motorboat knows, it can also be relatively hard and unyielding. With that in mind, one has to wonder ... why don't we hear more about suspension systems for watercraft? Well, if the folks at Australia's Nauti-Craft have anything to say about it, we soon will. Their prototype 2Play catamaran incorporates an interlinked hydraulic suspension, that isolates the deck from the two hulls.  Read More

The tiny imperfections in each smartphone's sensors leave a unique fingerprint in its shar...

Security-conscious smartphone users may decline apps' requests to "use your current location," but according to research conducted at the University of Illinois, doing so still doesn't mean that those users can't be tracked. This is because each phone's sensors – such as the accelerometer – have a unique "fingerprint." By identifying that fingerprint in sensor data sent from the phone, third parties could at the very least keep track of what the user is doing at what time.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 27,838 articles