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Ben Coxworth

Ben Coxworth
An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.
Top Articles by Ben Coxworth
Nasal septum cartilage cells can easily be coaxed into reproducing, providing a patient wi...

Depending on the part of the body and the nature of the injury, cartilage either doesn’t grow back at all, or does so very slowly. That’s why joint injuries often take a long time to heal, to the point that scientists are looking into using things like hydrogels and 3D printers to help speed the process. Now, however, researchers from Switzerland’s University of Basel are reporting that cartilage cells harvested from a patient’s own nose can be used to grow replacement cartilage for their knee.  Read More

The Schiller X1 in action

Last year, US entrepreneur Judah Schiller crossed San Francisco Bay on a bike – and no, he didn’t ride that bike across the Golden Gate Bridge. Instead, he mounted it on a Shuttle Bike kit, which adds pontoons and a propeller to a user-supplied bicycle. Since then, Judah has been working on designing an all-in-one "waterbike" of his own. The result, the Schiller X1, was officially unveiled this month.  Read More

Carbon black from tires reportedly makes a better anode material than the traditional grap...

There may soon be a new use for discarded tires ... besides turning them into mattresses for cows, that is. Researchers from the US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have devised a method of harvesting the carbon black from them, and using it to make anodes for better-performing lithium-ion batteries.  Read More

The MC2, ready to cruise

Well, another day, and another oddball transforming bicycle from Eurobike 2014. Yesterday, we took a look at the telescoping lever-drive Hank from Korea’s Bygen. Today, it’s the MC2 from Singapore-based IDSG Engineering and Trading. Designed by IDSG’s Jing Che and Quoc Bao Dang, its hinged frame allows it to be set into eight different configurations.  Read More

The implant measures internal optic pressure, excessive amounts of which can lead to loss ...

Currently, people with glaucoma must have their internal optic pressure (the pressure within their eye) regularly checked by a specialist. If that IOP gets too high, then steps need to be taken to lower it, before vision damage can occur. The problem is, the pressure can change quickly, potentially rising to dangerous levels between those checks. A new implant, however, could make it possible for patients to check their own IOP as often as they like, using their smartphone.  Read More

A sample of the hydrogel turns from blue to green to red, as it takes up glucose

Thanks to a new color-changing hydrogel, there may soon be a more reliable way of continuously monitoring the blood glucose levels of both diabetics and hospital patients. If incorporated into a device such as an implanted pump, it could automatically trigger the release of insulin into the bloodstream as needed.  Read More

The Hank Direct Bike offers an alternative to traditional folding bikes ... and to chains ...

Folding bicycles definitely have an advantage when it comes to easy toting and storage, although their chain presents a design challenge – it can’t just be folded sideways along with the frame, and there’s a risk that it will transfer gunk onto the rider’s clothing as they’re carrying the bike. Korean manufacturer Bygen has devised a solution, in the form of its Hank Direct Bike. Instead of a chain or belt drive, it has levers that transfer power from the pedals to the rear wheel.  Read More

Spheree presents 3D models in a fish bowl-like display, which responds to changes in the v...

Although viewing a 3D digital model of an item allows you get a sense of the "real" object, it certainly doesn’t help if you’re looking at that three-dimensional model on a flat screen. That’s why Spheree was created. The result of a collaboration between a group of Brazilian and Canadian universities, it’s a spherical display that users can walk around, viewing a model from various angles as if the object were physically in front of them.  Read More

Members of the VALERI Project, with an early omniRob prototype

In the automotive industry, life is pretty easy for the car-assembling robots ... they just sit in the same place performing the same task, day after day. Things are different in the aerospace industry, however. Airplanes aren’t made on assembly lines, so any robots used in their construction would have to move around them. The member organizations of the European VALERI Project (Validation of Advanced, Collaborative Robotics for Industrial Applications) are now working on making such mobile, autonomous plane-building robots a reality.  Read More

Orgenesis' approach involves harvesting the patient's own liver cells and converting them ...

When pancreatic islet allo-transplantation therapy was first introduced, it provided hope for countless diabetics tired of daily insulin injections. While the technology has delivered on much of its promise, Tel Aviv-based regenerative medicine firm Orgenesis is currently developing a treatment of its own, that it claims addresses much of the shortcomings of islet therapy. In a nutshell, its approach involves converting the patient’s own liver cells into cells that produce insulin.  Read More

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