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Ben Coxworth

Ben Coxworth

An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.

Follow Ben:

— Health and Wellbeing

Nourish creates daily nutritional supplements based on users' needs

By - July 27, 2015 4 Pictures

While some people take off-the-shelf supplements, others use products that are formulated to their own unique nutritional needs. According to the folks at Boston-based startup FitNatic, however, that's still not specific enough. Their Nourish device keeps track of its user's states of health and fitness, then serves up nutritional supplements that are custom-blended on a daily basis.

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i-protect system aims to prevent door-dings

Car doors can be ungainly when they're being opened, smacking into things like garage walls, light posts, or the body panels of other cars. While some groups have developed side bumpers to minimize the damage, a group of German high school students has come up with an alternative – a system that stops the door from opening before it can hit anything.

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— Around The Home

Sulfite-filtering Üllo aims to make wine-drinking less whine-inducing

By - July 22, 2015 5 Pictures

Do you get itchy, cramped-up or wheezy from even a little bit of wine? It could be because you have a sulfite sensitivity. Sulfites are sulfur-based compounds that are added in the wine-making process to prevent bacterial growth – they keep the wine from spoiling while it's in transit and storage. Given that they're not needed once the wine has been poured, however, chemist James Kornacki has developed a device for reducing them at that point in the game – it's called the Üllo.

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— Good Thinking

Scissoring origami-inspired bridge could help out in disasters

By - July 22, 2015 3 Pictures

Whether they're floods, earthquakes or landslides, natural disasters have a nasty habit of cutting survivors off from aid by destroying bridges. While traditional portable bridges can already be set up in such situations, researchers from Hiroshima University recently demonstrated a new model that is said to be "the world’s fastest, largest, strongest, and lightest expanding temporary bridge."

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— Bicycles

Loud Bicycle Horn is ... well, it's LOUD

By - July 22, 2015 3 Pictures

One of the big reasons people give for not commuting by bicycle is the fear that drivers won't notice them on the road. While various devices are available to make bikes and riders more visible, the designers of the 125-decibel Loud Bicycle Horn have concentrated their efforts on another goal – making sure that cyclists are heard.

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