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Ben Coxworth

Ben Coxworth

An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.

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— Science

Tech can tell if you're in love

As Valentine's Day fast approaches, many people in the thralls of a new relationship may find themselves wondering, "Does he/she really love me?". Well, if those people have access to a thermal imaging camera, they may just get their answer – at least, so a group of researchers at the University of Granada tells us.

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— Science

Scientists use laser to "weld" neurons together

Whether it's as a research tool or a step in repairing severed nerves, the ability to join neurons together has some serious applications. If left to occur naturally, the process takes several hours, limiting its practicality. Now, however, scientists at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Engineering have developed a method of doing so within 15 milliseconds.

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— Materials

Grass used to make thinner, stronger condoms

So first of all … no, nobody is thinking of weaving together blades of grass to make condoms. Scientists at Australia's University of Queensland, however, are having success with condoms made from a latex with added nanocellulose obtained from a native grass. Not only are they stronger than regular latex condoms, but they could be as thin as the diameter of a human hair.

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— Health & Wellbeing

Hyperice aims to create a buzz with new muscle-loosening sphere

As most serious athletes will know, one of the keys to avoiding muscle cramps involves loosening up the soft tissues both before and after intense physical activity. While there are already balls and rollers that let people do so, Hyperice's new Hypersphere adds another dimension – its core vibrates at a high frequency, reportedly getting those muscles and tendons as loose as a goose.

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