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Ben Coxworth

Ben Coxworth
An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.
Top Articles by Ben Coxworth
The Mazda MX-5 Miata 25th Anniversary Edition

In February 1989, Mazda introduced what would become the best-selling two-seater sports car of all time – the MX-5 Miata. Twenty-five years and over 940,000 sales later, Mazda has now unveiled a special 25th Anniversary Edition of the car, which we spied at this year's New York International Auto Show.  Read More

A nanoparticle-based surgical adhesive might soon take the place of sutures, staples or po...

In the ongoing quest to develop better ways of sealing wounds within the body, scientists have created surgical adhesives inspired by porcupine quills, mussels and slugs. Not all good ideas have to come from the animal kingdom, however. Recently, French researchers have had success in repairing internal organs using an adhesive solution that incorporates either silica or iron oxide nanoparticles.  Read More

Patrick Priebe's electromagnetic webshooter

In honor of The Amazing Spider-Man 2 opening tomorrow in Germany (among other places), German laser weapons hobbyist Patrick Priebe has just filled us in on his latest creation – it's a Spider-Man-inspired electromagnetic webshooter, that actually fires a harpoon-tipped length of fishing line into styrofoam targets.  Read More

A microscope image of some of the regenerated esophageal tissue

Ordinarily, when patients require a total or partial replacement of their esophagus, tissue from their own stomach or intestine is used. This doesn't always result in a fully-functioning organ, plus it also involves the surgical removal of the needed material. Now, however, scientists have come a step closer to being able to grow a new esophagus from the patient's own stem cells, and in fact have already done so – with rats.  Read More

The Bugatti Noun ceramic glass toaster

Before you get too excited, it's not that Bugatti. Nonetheless, the Bugatti appliance company's transparent Noun toaster does sport some quite remarkable features, including the ability to very precisely cook foods other than toast – and at a price of a thousand bucks, you'd expect it to.  Read More

What's old is new again – the Vicci 6.2 Convertible

Back in 2007, we first heard about the planned US$2 million Natalia supercar. Designed by Palm Springs-based DiMora Motorcar, it's envisioned as the world’s most luxurious and technologically advanced automobile. DiMora is still working on that lofty goal, but in the meantime it's just released a model with a look that brings decidedly lower-tech cars to mind – the 1930s-inspired Vicci 6.2 Convertible.  Read More

Carbon monoxide gas could be a new main source of ethanol fuel (Photo: Shutterstock)

Ethanol may be touted as a more eco-friendly alternative to fossil fuels, but it's not without its own drawbacks. Most importantly, the corn or other plants required as feedstock often take up field space that could otherwise be put to use growing food crops. Also, as with other plants, the feedstock crops require large amounts of water and fertilizer. Now, however, scientists at Stanford University have devised a method of producing liquid ethanol from carbon monoxide gas.  Read More

Examples of the microparticles, shown here much larger than actual size

There's now yet another potential weapon in the war against counterfeiting. Scientists at MIT have developed tiny color-striped microparticles that could be used to verify the authenticity of currency, medication, consumer goods, or almost anything else.  Read More

Scientists are trying to boost the amount of sunlight that gets down to urban alleys (Phot...

Everyone knows that downtown alleyways are dark at night, but even in the daytime, shadows cast by the tall buildings on either side can make them quite gloomy. While that might not matter much for little-used alleys, it's certainly a factor in cities where people live and work in them. That's why researchers from Egypt's Ain Shams University are developing a new type of panel that diverts sunlight from buildings' roofs down into the alleyways beside them.  Read More

Scientists have used steroids to enhance the performance of stem cells  (Photo: Shuttersto...

Stem cells are highly promising for the treatment of everything from HIV to leukemia to baldness. In many cases, however, a great number of them must be used in order have a noticeable effect, which makes treatments impractical or expensive. Now, scientists at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that a smaller number of stem cells can still get the job done, if they're first hopped up on steroids.  Read More

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