Advertisement
more top stories »

Ben Coxworth

Ben Coxworth

An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.

Follow Ben:

— Environment

Nanotech could rid cattle of ticks, with less collateral damage

By - August 31, 2015

If you've ever used tick medicine on your dog, then you're probably aware of how toxic the stuff is. Well, it's used on cows too, and it can end up in their meat, milk, or the surrounding environment. Fortunately, however, scientists at the National University of Mexico have developed a new type of tick treatment for cattle that is reportedly much less toxic than what's currently used.

Read More
— Bicycles

Kickstand Pump does quadruple duty

By - August 28, 2015 5 Pictures

When most of us think of a cycling multi-tool, we picture something that goes in a jersey pocket or saddle pack. Seoul-based company Leeman, however, is looking at things a little differently. Its Kickstand Pump mounts on the bike, and serves not only as a kickstand and pump, but also a tire lever and tail light.

Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

New tech lets the paralyzed speak via "breath signals"

By - August 28, 2015

We've seen a number of technologies that speak on behalf of paralyzed people who are unable to do so. While some of these utilize cues as subtle as eye movements, the fact is that many severely paralyzed patients are unable to manage even those. That's why researchers at Britain's Loughborough University have created a system that speaks words based on the user's breathing.

Read More
— Bicycles

fUCI concept bike flips the bird at racing rules

By - August 28, 2015 13 Pictures

Ever wonder why you don't see things like recumbents in the Tour de France? Well, it's because of the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), which is the world governing body for bicycle racing. Among other things, the UCI places unwavering restrictions on the design of racing bikes. While this is intended to keep some racers from having an unfair advantage, many people feel that it also holds back the evolution of bikes designed for non-racers. That's why Specialized’s Creative Director, Robert Egger, created the fUCI concept bike. It's a speed bike designed without UCI restrictions in mind ... and we'll let you figure out what the F in its name stands for.

Read More
— Bicycles

Ruder Trike lets you pedal and row at the same time

By - August 27, 2015 4 Pictures

We've already seen a few bicycles – such as the Varibike and Raxibo Hand-Tret-Velo – that are intended to provide riders with more exercise and more power output by having them pedal with their legs and arms. Germany's Ruder-Rad, however, believes that a two-wheeler is too unstable a platform for that kind of four-limbed locomotion. That's why it's introducing the recumbent Ruder Trike.

Read More

Waste paper could be a new source of "green" lighter fluid

Lighter fluid may be useful for getting barbecue briquettes or campfires lit, but it's not the most eco-friendly stuff in the world. It's often made from crude oil, and gives off toxic fumes when it burns. A team of scientists from Hong Kong and Hungary are developing what could be a greener solution, however – cleaner-burning lighter fluid derived from discarded paper.

Read More
— Space

Self-healing material could plug holes in space ships

By - August 26, 2015

As the movies have shown us, space travel is an intimidating prospect, what with the possibilities of running out of air, the rocket engines conking out, or the shipboard computer deciding to bump off the crew. Another danger is fast-flying orbital debris piercing the hull. Scientists may be on their way to a solution to that one, however, in the form of a new self-healing material.

Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement