Advertisement

Antonio Pasolini

Health & Wellbeing

FitSleep wants to beam you with alpha waves to provide better sleep

Thanks to stress, device overload and other factors, the world is getting less sleep and, as a result, the gadget market is becoming increasingly populated with sleep devices that promise better rest. One of the latest concepts comes from Xuan Yao, a Chinese designer and entrepreneur whose company FitSleep is trying to break into the market with a new device called the FitSleep α1 that uses alpha waves to beam us into better sleep. Read More

Environment

This machine draws fertilizer from sewage

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB in Stuttgart, Germany, have developed a new method to harvest phosphorus, a key component of agricultural fertilizers, from wastewater. It incorporates a reactor that is environmentally-friendly, doesn't rely on chemicals, and is ready to be marketed.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Purple potatoes may be as healthy as they are colorful

Researchers at Colorado State University (CSU) have developed new varieties of purple potato that are much richer in antioxidants than traditional white and yellow varieties. They're said to be on par with superfoods such as blueberries and pomegranates, potentially upgrading the humble potato to the ranks of health food.Read More

Medical

New cancer treatment targets sick cells only

Chemotherapy is the standard treatment for cancer but it also causes strong side effects and kills not only cancer cells, but healthy ones, too. In order to mitigate the damage this type of therapy causes to a person already ravaged by illness, a team of Brazilian researchers is working a new technique to deliver drugs with more precision, so healthy cells are more likely to be spared from chemical onslaught.Read More

Medical

Rapid finger-prick test to tackle tuberculosis

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), in 2014 over 9 million people contracted tuberculosis (TB), with 1.5 million dying from the disease. Over 95 percent of these deaths occur in developing countries, which is exacerbated by difficulties in diagnosing the disease based on signs and symptoms. A new point-of-care test aimed at use in areas of limited resources could help speed up the diagnosis and spread of TB.Read More

Good Thinking

Wheelchair controlled by facial expressions to hit the market within 2 years

Brazilian researchers have developed a wheelchair that can be controlled through small facial, head or iris movements. The team at Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e de Computação da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEEC/Unicamp) says the technology could help people with cerebral palsy, those who have suffered a stroke or live with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other conditions that prevent precise hand movements.Read More

Medical

Diagnostic blood test shows promise in early detection of Parkinson's

Early detection of Parkinson's could help doctors decide on treatment options or improve disease management. But often people get a neurological examination after symptoms appear, when vital brain cells have already been destroyed. Now a game-changing blood test is being developed to give doctors a reliable method to detect the disease earlier through clinical biomarkers.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Earpiece detects and warns of epileptic seizures

Timely detection of epileptic seizures is crucial in order to give the patient the care they need. Electroencephalography is only available in hospitals, but as the sensor market expands in tandem with mobile technology, it was only a matter of time until a small, portable system would be developed. We have already seen the Embrace smartwatch, and now a German consortium headed by a team of epileptologists at the University Hospital Bonn is working to launch a new consumer option in the near future.Read More

Environment

Today's CO2 may become tomorrow's concrete

As carbon emissions continue to rise and cause the planet to warm up, we need to find ways to reduce them. Capturing carbon at the source of its emission is one of the solutions, but there is still the problem of storing all the carbon sucked out of the atmosphere. If that captured carbon could be put to good use, then perhaps we could have the perfect capturing system in place. This is the line of thinking that researchers at University of California (UCLA) are currently pursuing, and they have some big plans for all that carbon: turning it into concrete.Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning