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Antonio Pasolini

Health & Wellbeing

Earpiece detects and warns of epileptic seizures

Timely detection of epileptic seizures is crucial in order to give the patient the care they need. Electroencephalography is only available in hospitals, but as the sensor market expands in tandem with mobile technology, it was only a matter of time until a small, portable system would be developed. We have already seen the Embrace smartwatch, and now a German consortium headed by a team of epileptologists at the University Hospital Bonn is working to launch a new consumer option in the near future.Read More

Environment

Today's CO2 may become tomorrow's concrete

As carbon emissions continue to rise and cause the planet to warm up, we need to find ways to reduce them. Capturing carbon at the source of its emission is one of the solutions, but there is still the problem of storing all the carbon sucked out of the atmosphere. If that captured carbon could be put to good use, then perhaps we could have the perfect capturing system in place. This is the line of thinking that researchers at University of California (UCLA) are currently pursuing, and they have some big plans for all that carbon: turning it into concrete.Read More

Good Thinking

Solar-powered "Sterile Box" targets hospital infections in developing countries

One of the risks of undergoing a surgical procedure is getting an on-site infection, which leads to longer periods in hospital and even death, especially when bacteria is resistant to current drugs. In developing countries the problem is bigger as hospitals often lack staple sterilization instruments such as an autoclave. In order to tackle this issue, a team of Rice University students and their mentors are developing a solar-powered sterilization unit that could be a life-saver in regions with little or no access to this type of equipment.Read More

Urban Transport

Self-balancing wheelchair goes hands-free

A New Zealand designer is revamping the traditional wheelchair design with a new model that frees the arms of the user. Instead of using the hands to create movement, the user moves their upper body to direct the two wheels. Kevin Halsall was inspired to develop Ogo after noticing a friend's difficulties with a traditional wheelchair, and deciding that things could be better.
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Environment

Waste tomatoes tapped as source of electricity

The tomato is a very versatile fruit. It can be juiced, made into cold soup, used as sauce or just eaten raw in a salad. It is a true food icon and now its usefulness could be expanding to an unexpected area as a US team is experimenting with the fruit as a source of electricity. A pilot project developed by researchers based in several American institutions involves a biological-based fuel cell that uses tomato waste from harvests in Florida, giving a new lease of life to organic material that would otherwise end up in landfills.Read More

Cutter adds another string to plastic bottle's bow

City recycling programs have helped to reduce the amount of plastic waste making its way into landfills and the world's oceans, but a two-man team from France is providing a more direct approach. Their Plastic Bottle Cutter us a simple tool that lets plastic bottles be repurposed into something useful.Read More

Good Thinking

Bringing life-saving tech to conflict zones

There are tens of millions trapped in conflict zones at the moment, having to live in desperate conditions and uncertainty. Cut off from basic services, those people need to rely on humanitarian aid to survive. A new partnership recently launched in Lausanne, Switzerland, will leverage the possibilities of new technologies so aid agencies can provide solutions where they are needed most.
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Health & Wellbeing

Fruit and veg intake shown to have long-lasting benefits in cutting breast cancer risk

The general health benefits of eating fruit and vegetables are well known, but researchers have provided young women with yet another reason to eat their greens. A large-scale study carried out by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, which followed thousands of women for several years, has found a strong correlation between a high-fiber diet during adolescence and young adulthood and a reduced risk of developing breast cancer later in life.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Natural plant pigment makes for diabetic-friendly bread

Good for news for people with diabetes, and it's edible, too. Scientists at the National University of Singapore have created a bread with anthocyanin, a plant pigment that helps slow digestion, which helps the body keep glucose levels in the blood under control. The team hopes it will help pave the way for a new market of healthier food products for people who have to manage their diabetes.Read More

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