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Anthony Wood

Anthony Wood

Anthony is a recent law school graduate who also has a degree in Ancient History, for some reason or another. Residing in the UK, Anthony has had a passion about anything space orientated from a young age and finds it baffling that we have yet to colonize the moon. When not writing he can be found watching American football and growing out his magnificent beard.

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— Space

World Asteroid Day raises awareness of a deadly menace

By - July 2, 2015 7 Pictures

June 30th marked the world's first Asteroid Day – a global awareness campaign designed to promote an understanding of the dangers presented by the rocky bodies, and how best to protect our planet from a potentially catastrophic asteroid impact. Significantly, the campaign was held on the anniversary of the 1908 Tunguska asteroid strike – an impact that devastated eight hundred square miles of Siberian forest, and served as a powerful indicator of the damage that could be wrought by just one of the 600,000 plus known asteroids whizzing around our solar system.

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— Space

Best evidence of active lava flows spotted on Venus

By - June 24, 2015 3 Pictures

ESA's Venus Express spacecraft has found the best evidence yet of active lava flows on Venus. Earlier missions to Venus have shown that the surface bears the unmistakable scarring of fierce, ancient volcanic activity. However, prior to Venus express, no mission had been successful in directly imaging clues to contemporary volcanism. This quirk has baffled scientists for years, as it has long been assumed that Venus hosts an internal heat source, and that heat has to escape somehow.

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— Space

Dawn zooms in on white spots, finds pyramid-like mountain on Ceres

By - June 24, 2015 4 Pictures

Fresh images snapped by NASA's Dawn spacecraft have provided a clearer look at the enigmatic white spots that mark the surface of the dwarf planet Ceres. The spots have baffled scientists who are unable to discern their nature or composition. To add to the intrigue the probe has spotted a solitary, unusual pyramid-like mountain jutting out of the otherwise relatively smooth surface.

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— Environment

Researchers say Earth is entering a sixth mass extinction event

By - June 21, 2015 1 Picture

While there is still much conjecture about the causes of some mass extinctions, it is generally believed that they can occur when a biosphere under long-term stress is subjected to a short-term shock. In 1982, Jack Sepkoski and David M. Raup published a paper identifying five mass extinction events throughout Earth's history. Now a team of researchers claims that we are entering a sixth mass extinction event, which threatens our very existence.

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— Space

ESA successfully tests 3D printed thruster

By - June 21, 2015 3 Pictures

The European Space Agency (ESA) has successfully test fired a 3D printed platinum alloy thruster combustion chamber and nozzle. The world first test is further evidence that the 3D printing approach is a viable one for the aerospace industry, with the potential to cut costs by streamlining production methods and adding a greater level of flexibility in terms of supply and demand construction.

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— Space

New research on Saturn's polar cyclones could allow for a better understanding of distant exoplanets

By - June 19, 2015 2 Pictures

A team of scientists from MIT has put forward a theory that would explain the presence of enormous polar cyclones present on the gas giant Saturn. The cyclones, first discovered by the Cassini spacecraft in 2008, are so massive that they could swallow the Earth in their expanse. The research may even lead to better characterization of the atmosphere of distant exoplanets.

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— Space

UrtheCast releases first Ultra-HD full-color video content from the International Space Station

By - June 17, 2015 4 Pictures

Today, Canadian company UrtheCast is celebrating the release of three full-color videos shot from its Ultra HD Iris imaging device, mounted on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). The videos are but a small taste of the high-quality, near-live streams that the company is planning to make available to the world with the full launch of the UrtheCast Earth-viewing platform.

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— Space

ALMA captures sharpest ever view of star formation in the distant universe

By - June 17, 2015 3 Pictures

The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has succeeded in imaging star formation regions in a distant galaxy, with a resolution six times greater than that achievable by the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy, dubbed HATLAS J090311.6+003906 or SDP.81, would ordinarily be far too distant to be observed in such impressive detail. However, thanks to an amazing cosmic coincidence, it has fallen foul of a phenomenon known as gravitational lensing, which essentially grants astronomers the opportunity to gaze into the distant past.

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