Advertisement
more top stories »

Adam Williams

Adam Williams

Adam scours the globe from his home in North Wales in order to bring the best of innovative architecture and sustainable design to the pages of Gizmag. Most of his spare time is spent dabbling in music, tinkering with old Macintosh computers and trying to keep his even older VW bus on the road.

Follow Adam:

— Architecture

Ambitious plan unveiled to create new Egyptian capital

By - March 23, 2015 6 Pictures
Architecture projects don't come much bigger or more challenging than building an entire new capital city from scratch, but that's what the Egyptian Government, Skidmore, Owings & Merril (SOM), and international group of investors Capital City Partners Limited intend with the Capital Cairo project. The recently-proposed city, seven times the size of Paris, and twelve times bigger than Manhattan, would measure approximately 700 sq km (270 sq miles) and be home to 7 million residents. Read More
— Architecture

Here comes the sun: NBBJ unveils shadow-reducing concept towers

By - March 17, 2015 7 Pictures
With over 230 new towers planned for London, the UK's capital could soon be left in the shade – literally. Though shade has always been a concern for architects and planners, London's dramatic increase in tall buildings will mean more darkness than before for those at street level. NBBJ has developed a custom algorithm that could mitigate this, and the firm used it to design a pair of concept towers that promise to reduce shadows on the ground by 60 percent, compared to similar-sized buildings. Read More

Tornado-shaped concept tower tempts fate in Tulsa

If you see a tornado in Tulsa, Oklahoma, you'll want to find shelter pretty quickly. In a considerable display of chutzpah, local firm Kinslow, Keith & Todd (KKT) has unveiled a plan to build a novel tornado-shaped tower in its home city that includes a revolving restaurant and weather research station. Read More
— Architecture

Berkeley researchers pioneer new powder-based concrete 3D printing technique

By - March 12, 2015 13 Pictures
3D printing looks set to become very important in architecture, but we've yet to see exactly how the future of large-scale click-and-print construction will play out. A potential step forward comes via a team of UC Berkeley researchers led by Associate Professor of Architecture Ronald Rael, who recently created a free-standing pavilion called Bloom to demonstrate the precision of their powder-based cement method of 3D-printed construction. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Subscribe to Gizmag's email newsletter

Advertisement