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ADAPTable – the sliding tile puzzle of workstations

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September 14, 2012

ADAPTable is comprised of six wooden sections which can be slid into the most suitable pos...

ADAPTable is comprised of six wooden sections which can be slid into the most suitable position for specific tasks

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Many of us who spend our working days at a desk have jobs that require a wide range of tools for a wide range of tasks. This means that a workstation can quickly become overwhelmed with objects placed within easy reach. The Tambour Table is one attempt at addressing this problem, but design company MAMIKIM & Co. has tried to create a desk that is adaptable for a range of working environments, with different sections suitable for different jobs. If you have ever wanted to own a giant sliding tile puzzle in the form of a desk, then ADAPTable may be just for you.

ADAPTable comprises six equal A4-sized sections which can be slotted together into the frame of the desk. Each either has a tool built into it – a pencil holder, a cutting mat, an edged ruler – or is plain to allow for normal desk functions. The idea is that the user adapts the table as they see fit, positioning the sections in the correct manner for each task as it crops up.

The beauty of ADAPTable is that more sections could be forged in the future to fulfill the needs of specific individuals ... in which case this would become a bespoke desk made to order, but with the buyer still able to change the layout at a moment's notice.

Even without the unique design, ADAPTable would be a fine piece of furniture, with a worktop made from American black walnut, brass plate bracings, and steel legs. These legs are designed to also adapt to the changing needs of the user, with two height settings made possible by a surprisingly simple method whereby the extensions fold down and lock into place.

Even the legs of ADAPTable are versatile, with this image showing the workstation raised t...

ADAPTable is clearly a versatile workstation, but its practicality is still in question. With a traditional desk you can have all the same tools, none of which are exactly revolutionary, sitting on top of the panel rather than built into it. So, switching jobs to one that requires a cutting mat, for example, would mean simply sliding the object across until it was in the right position. With ADAPTable, you would need to reposition at least two sections of the desk to get the same result.

MAMIKIM & Co. will be exhibiting ADAPTable at Tent London during the London Design Festival 2012. No details on availability or pricing have yet been announced.

Source: MAMIKIM & Co. via MoCo Loco

About the Author
Dave Parrack Dave is a technology journalist with a ravenous appetite for gadgets, gizmos, and gubbins. He's based in the U.K., and from his center of operations writes about all facets of modern and future technology. He has learned more in his five years writing for the Web than he did in 11 years at school, and with none of the boring subjects thrown in to the mix.   All articles by Dave Parrack
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2 Comments

Its ugly and not very user friendly. What i always wanted was a lidded desk that i could open without everything sliding off. But if it opened down then my legs would get in the way or it could open to the side wait thats a brilliant idea. i even have the perfect name for such a function "desk draw" hmm very scifi. The perfect desk would be absolutely flat with a small area under it where i could place things into an alternate universe and retrieve them at will - wait thats still a desk draw.

MasterG
14th September, 2012 @ 07:33 pm PDT

Yes, seems easier to just move objects on your desk...but this is a beautiful design, I think I'd buy it for that more than anything! :)

Jessica Panama Ramesch
17th September, 2012 @ 11:53 am PDT
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