When Chevy introduced the 2014 Corvette Stingray at the 2013 North American International Auto Show, it estimated that it would have 450 horsepower, making it the most powerful standard Corvette ever. As it turns out, it's even more powerful. Chevy released the official SAE-certified ratings this week, which show the new Corvette battling the highway with up to 460 ponies.

The new Corvette uses an all-new aluminum-block LT1 engine, which Chevy originally expected to put out 450 lb-ft (610 Nm) of torque, along with its 450 hp. Both numbers see a spike now that they've gotten official. When equipped with the standard exhaust system, the Stingray pulls 455 hp and 460 lb-ft (624 Nm) of torque out of the 6.2-liter V8. Buyers that opt to add the available performance exhaust will enjoy a modest boost to 460 hp at 6,000 rpm and 465 lb-ft at 4,600 rpm.

Chevy says that not only is the new LT1 the most powerful standard Corvette engine ever, but its 74 hp-per-liter is greater than the power density of the sixth-generation Corvette Z06's racing-derived 7.0-liter LS7 V8. Chevy uses several technologies, including direct injection, Active Fuel Management and continuously variable valve timing, to give its newest Vette engine its high output and power density. The automaker has said previously that the new LT1 is the most significant redesign in the small block's long, illustrious history, which goes back to 1955.

"The LT1’s performance complements the Corvette’s low mass with a tremendous feeling of power that builds as the rpm climbs," explains Jordan Lee, Small Block chief engineer. "Drivers will experience more power and acceleration than ever before with the standard engine – in fact, its power and torque surpass many uplevel engines offered by competitors."

Chevy reiterates the 2014 Corvette's estimated 0-60 mph (96.5 km/h) time of under four seconds.

The 2014 Corvette will go on sale in the third quarter of this year, starting at US$51,995, which includes destination fee. The $56,995 convertible will follow before the end of the year.

Source: GM