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Wearables


— Wearables

MTM's RAD watch packs a built-in Geiger counter

There are few things more embarrassing than being caught in an all-out thermonuclear war and realizing that you've forgotten your Geiger counter. To prevent this social faux pas, MTM has released its Special Ops RAD watch. Available in black or silver (gray has already sold out) titanium cases, the RAD watch includes an integrated Geiger-Müller tube for measuring exposure to harmful ionizing radiation. Read More
— Wearables

NFC Ring lets you unlock your door by giving it the finger

Near Field Communication (NFC) is a technology that's just oozing with potential. Though the mainstream adoption of near-field communication hasn't exactly gone as planned, that doesn't mean that NFC isn't still a fertile ground for great products. One upcoming product, the NFC Ring, is an example of the kinds of imaginative projects that could become more widespread a few years down the road. Read More

Navigo digital compass gives directions with vibration

Having a GPS-enabled device with a built-in digital compass in your pocket is nothing special these days, but there's still room for improvement when it comes to the usability of these functions. The Navigo rises to this challenge by putting a digital compass on your wrist and giving it the ability to guide you using vibrations, as well as link wirelessly to mapping information on your smartphone. Read More
— Wearables

On the ball: Eone debuts a tactile watch for the visually impaired

Unfortunately, there aren't many options available for the visually impaired when it comes to timepieces. While a number of talking watches and braille wristwatches with removable covers are already on the market, those often draw attention to a person's disability. That's why watchmaker Eone's debut timepiece, the Bradley, indicates the time with magnetic ball bearings that can be read subtly by touch. Read More
— Wearables Review

Review: Cynaps bone conduction hat

Walk into any electronics store and you'll see a wide variety of headphones. From tiny earbuds to high-end cans, they come in all shapes and sizes. They all have one thing in common though: they deliver sound directly to your ears. "Duh," right? But bone conduction goes in another direction: it skips the outer ear and takes the scenic route into your inner ear. Let's take a look at an accessory that plays your skull like an instrument, Max Virtual's Cynaps bone conduction hat. Read More
— Wearables

Tokyoflash's new watch tells the time and your blood alcohol level

There are plenty of pocket-sized breathalyzers on the market, but those can be awkward to keep on you at all times. If you want a gadget with some style that can also tell how blotto you are while out on the town, Tokyoflash has you covered. The Japanese watch-maker's new Kisai Intoxicated wristwatch has a built-in breathalyzer so you can always check if your blood alcohol content (BAC) is low enough to legally drive. Read More
— Wearables

AR glasses let profs know if students are understanding their lectures

It must be hard for university professors ... they tell their students to shout out if they don’t understand what’s being said in a lecture, yet few students are likely to feel comfortable raising their hand in front of the class and saying “I don’t get it.” Scientists at Spain’s la Universidad Carlos III de Madrid are hoping to address that situation, with a set of augmented reality glasses that let profs see who’s “not getting it,” without those students having to say so verbally. Read More
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