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Wearables

— Wearables

Designers create Leap Motion accessory to interpret sign language

Two Portuguese designers based in Sydney have come up with a practical idea for facilitating communication between people when sign language is involved. Catarina Araujo and Sofia Santos’ project, still at the development stage and looking for financial backers, taps Leap Motion technology to create a wearable sign language translator to be worn as a necklace. Read More
— Wearables

BearTek wireless gloves take control of your phone and action cam

Since the explosion of touchscreen-based smartphones, glove manufacturers have developed touchscreen-optimized gloves and treatments that allow wearers to maintain touchscreen capabilties while keeping their gloves on. The new BearTek Gloves play even nicer with portable electronics, syncing wirelessly and taking control of functions like call answering and music play. Read More
— Wearables

neurocam automatically shoots whatever its user finds interesting

Perhaps you know someone who's a member of the "lifelogging" community – these are people who record pretty much all of their waking hours, typically using small, wearable video cameras. The problem is, they inevitably end up with a lot of footage that's just ... well, boring, even to them. That's where the neurocam comes in. It's a prototype headset camera, that only records when it detects that its wearer is interested in what they're seeing. Read More
— Wearables Review

Review: TYLT Energi+ device-charging backpack

Not long ago, a backpack was a simple device, one made for carrying books, small personal items, and other stuff. Then, something changed, and backpacks started evolving. Now it's not at all uncommon to find a backpack that can actually charge the electronic devices within it. One such model is the Energi+ Backpack from TYLT, which I've been using for the past couple of weeks. It's not the first backpack equipped with a battery, but is it the best? Read More
— Wearables

Wristify thermoelectric bracelet makes heating and cooling personal

Most bracelets aren't likely to alter your temperature too much either way, but the Wristify isn't most bracelets. Developed by four MIT engineering students, the Wristify works on the principle that heating or cooling the skin on one part of the body can make the entire body feel warmer or colder. By creating a personal heating and cooling device, the Wristify team ultimately hopes to cut the amount of energy currently used to heat or cool entire buildings. Read More
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