Advertisement
more top stories »

Wearables


— Wearables

Mio’s Slice activity tracker takes the focus away from counting steps

Many activity trackers give you a step target to walk towards, or an active minute target to count down each day, but while these metrics are easy to understand, they're often not the best measure of fitness or exercise. Along with its new Slice activity tracker, Mio is launching a new Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI) system. This new metric gives you a score to reflect your body's response to exercise based on your heart rate.

Read More
— Wearables

Goldfinger smart glove gets power from finger movements

Smart gloves have potential as human-machine interfaces that can help extract us from the joystick and mouse era, but the challenge is to make them, natural, intuitive, and efficient. Scientists from Politecnico di Torino and MIT led by Giorgio De Pasquale of the Italian University believe they have have come a step closer to this goal with Goldfinger – a self-powering glove that promises simple gesture control.

Read More
— Wearables Review

Review: TomTom's Spark (Cardio + Music) fitness tracker brings the tunes

The TomTom Spark (Cardio + Music) is an activity and fitness tracker which could let you cut the number of gadgets you take on a workout. In addition to a full array of sensors including GPS and heart-rate monitoring, it boasts built-in music storage and playback via bluetooth. Gizmag recently spent a month with the tracker, to see what it's all about.

Read More
— Wearables

Urine-powered socks get transmissions flowing

Peeing in one's socks may not be everyone's first choice for powering their mobile devices, but apparently it could be an option. A team of researchers from the Bristol BioEnergy Centre at the University of the West of England is experimenting with a pair of socks that use urine to generate electricity via miniaturized microbial fuel cells. Results have already started to trickle in, with the system used to run a transmitter to send wireless signals to a desktop computer.

Read More
— Wearables

Ressence Type 5 diving watch fights water with oil

Diving watches are notoriously bulky affairs, and it isn't just for looks. The heavy construction and thick crystals are necessary to keep the timepiece from imploding in deep waters. The Ressence Type 5 recreational diving watch takes a different approach by adopting a shape inspired by sea turtles and filling it with oil, which not only makes it more pressure resistant, but also makes it readable underwater from any angle.

Read More
— Wearables

Gabriel computer system offers a guiding voice to users

If you ever wished you had an angel at your shoulder to give tips on how to carry out a difficult job, a digital version may not be that far off. A team of scientists at Carnegie Mellon University are working on a wearable cognitive assistance computer system named after the angel Gabriel that observes what a person is doing, provides prompts to help in completing tasks in real time, and avoids being a pest when not needed.

Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement