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Wearables

— Wearables

Lucid dreaming made easier with the Aurora EEG headband

Lucid dreaming is believed by many to aid in practicing skills, improving creativity, or just exploring adventurous new worlds, but requires practice and awareness to master. Aurora is an EEG-based headband aiming to enhance dreams and lower the barrier to lucid dreaming. With apps for multiple platforms, a host of features, and an open API for third party applications, iWinks' aim is to help the uninitiated take control of their dreams. Read More
— Wearables

Impact-sensing hair clip helps fight violent crime

According to the World Health Organization, 35 percent of women worldwide have fallen victim to either violence from their intimate partner, or sexual violence from a non-partner. While self-defense classes and pepper sprays form part of a solution, their value becomes questionable if the perpetrator is already known to the victim or attacks by surprise. The First Sign Hair Clip, a hair clip fitted with security sensors, is designed to not only send out a cry for help, but gather up evidence to ensure justice is served. Read More
— Wearables

Ring puts the finger on gesture control

We've already seen rings that unlock doors and mobile devices, show the time, act as a mouse or display notifications from a connected mobile device, but, like the Fin, the Ring from California-based Logbar aims to take finger wagging to the next level. Featuring Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) connectivity, the Ring is designed to allow control of mobile devices and home appliances, make electronic payments and even type text in mid air with a wave of a finger. Read More
— Wearables

One Llama app alerts users to important sounds while wearing headphones

Let's be honest, walking around in a busy city with loud music blasting through a pair of headphones is not a safe thing to do. Still, that doesn't stop people from doing it every day. A startup called One Llama has just announced a new application that's designed to make that activity a little less dangerous. It constantly listens to background noise, and when it hears something that the user needs to know about, such as a car horn, it automatically mutes the music and alerts them. At least, that's the promise. Read More
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