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Wearable Electronics


— Wearable Electronics

LG's KizON wearable helps parents keep tabs on the kids

Children are wily creatures. They just love to run around with their friends, explore new places, and generally enjoy the freedom of just being a kid. Though this is part of the stress-free life of being a child, it is also often the source of anxiety for some parents who constantly worry about where their child is. In an attempt to relieve this anxiety, LG has created KizON, a wearable device that not only lets concerned parents know where their precious progeny are 24 hours a day, but also provides the ability to call them if necessary. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Vibrating glove teaches Braille through passive haptic learning

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a glove that helps users learn to read and write Braille, all while focusing on unrelated activities. The wearable computer uses miniature vibrating motors sewn into the knuckles, and was found to assist in developing motor skills in participants without them focusing on the movement of their hands. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Damson hopes to get inside your head with Headbones

Though headphones that use bone conduction technology to transmit sounds through the cheek bones to the inner ear are not exactly new, a trip to the personal audio section of your local electronics store will confirm that they haven't really jumped into the mainstream. Having taken Maxell's Vibrabone earphones and the Cynaps hat for test drives, we can see why the technology might not appeal to folks who love the full fat sonic experience which cans that throw sounds down your ear canal can deliver. The UK's Damson Audio is looking to change that with the development of the stylish Bluetooth-enabled Headbones, which the company says are going to shake up the headphone market. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Safelet is one alarming bracelet

Sexual violence is sadly still a problem facing (mostly) women in countries around the world. The statistics regarding the number of cases is shocking, but the effect that it has on all women, whether victims or otherwise, is likewise depressing. Safelet aims to make the world a safer place, and foster a feeling of security for people wearing this "alarming" (in both the figurative and literal senses) bracelet. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Ringly smart ring will buzz women's fingers later this year

Most of the wearable computers we've seen so far have been unabashedly masculine. Okay, to be fair, women can enjoy Google Glass or a Gear 2 smartwatch just as easily a man can (and I know some awesome women who do). But I'd also bet that most buyers of these beefy and utilitarian devices have been geeky, early-adopting men. Ringly, on the other hand, is the rare wearable that's being marketed solely to women. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Smash wearable tech helps tennis players improve their game

The wearable tech market is growing rapidly, and while it might sometimes seem like an unnecessary luxury for most walks of life, one place it actually does make sense is in sports. Athletes are always looking for ways to improve their performance, and wearable devices allow them to track exactly what they need to work on. Smash is a new device that its creator hopes will offer these benefits specifically to tennis players. Read More
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