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USB drive uses voice recognition security

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April 22, 2012

Voicelok Voice Authenticating USB Drive claims to provide the world’s first voicecode secu...

Voicelok Voice Authenticating USB Drive claims to provide the world’s first voicecode security

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Fingerprint recognition has long been used to protect sensitive data on USB drives - here’s another approach. This 8GB USB storage device uses voice recognition software to detect a password spoken by the user.

The Voicelok Voice Authenticating USB Drive claims to provide the world’s first voicecode security USB drive using software that can "accurately detect the specific frequencies and nuances" in its owner’s voice. We can’t vouch for how reliable this software is or whether your enterprising, voice-impersonating work colleagues will be able to get to your files.

The $US49.95 device is designed to work on a PC or a Mac and there is no software installation required to set the drive up. It also comes with alternative password entry methods, just in case you come down with a bad case of laryngitis.

Source: Voicelok via Hammacher Schlemmer

2 Comments

From a security perspective, this is more a gimmick than a useful tool as one can presumably record the true owner speaking his password, and then later feed the recording to the device. While key loggers can capture someone typing a password, the act of typing is much less public than speaking the same password for everyone around to hear.

Xavier
23rd April, 2012 @ 01:14 pm PDT

The above comment is actually inaccurate. Voicelok is sensitive to the exact way in which the password is said, thus a random recording of you saying snippets of words that is then reconstituted into a password phrase is unlikely to pass muster. It is also highly unlikely that a person would be standing in the exact position right next to one while they speak their voice password for an accurate recording to be taken.

LLittle
1st May, 2012 @ 02:17 pm PDT
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