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Urban Transport

— Urban Transport

The Electroscoot – 50 miles for 50 cents

April 14, 2006 Personal mobility options and how we tackle the daily commute greatly influences the lives of each of us. The ecological footprint each of us has on the planet influences everyone. With this in mind, the ElectroScoot was conceived and built. Somewhat reminiscent of the Segway in many aspects, the ElectroScoot is a functional, low cost objet d’art. It runs 50 miles for about 50 cents, does 30 km/h and recharges fully in six hours. No parking costs and no helmet required (please check your local laws). A red hot price point of 1500 Euro makes this a likely winner in our minds and the entire design process is well documented on the Electroscoot web site. Designers GRO are seeking manufacturing partners for the project. Read More
— Urban Transport

The first carbon racing bike from Mercedes-Benz

April 6, 2006 Carbon fibre has some extraordinary properties in that it is very light and very strong. It is also very expensive, so it only gets used where the amount of money spent is immaterial compared to the performance of the product. Mercedes Benz currently uses carbon fibre in just one of its products – the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren, the world’s first production car with a bodyshell made entirely of carbon fibre. Carbon fibre is also used extensively in the McLaren Mercedes F1 cars of Kimi Raikkonen and Juan Pablo Montoya. And later this month a second Mercedes-Benz product will be available that is constructed mainly of carbon fibre – the Carbon Bike, the new flagship human-powered Merc. Thanks to its ultra-lightweight carbon-fibre frame, this US$3665 thoroughbred weighs in at a mere 8.3 kilograms. Read More
— Urban Transport

World’s largest quarter pipe

April 4, 2006 After jumping over the Great Wall Of China on his skateboard, Danny Way will continue to push the boundaries of what’s possible on a skateboard when he attempts to break the world 'Bomb Drop' record in Las Vegas tomorrow. The current World Record is held by Norway’s Adil Dyani who dropped 12 ft 3.6 inches into an 18 ft ramp for a total drop of 30 ft 4 inches. Danny's attempt will more than double the previous record with a freefall of between 20 ft and 30 ft into a 46 ft high ramp that is 24 ft wide. He will then ride at a speed of up to 45mph across 64' of flat bottom into the world's largest quarterpipe (27 ft high x 48 ft wide). The Guinness Book of World Records will attend to certify the structure and the drop and the event, which will be held from 6-8 PM at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino on Wednesday, April 5, is free to the public. The event kicks off the CTIA trade show and was created to launch Ignition’s mobile phone action-sports content service. Read More
— Urban Transport

The SUB G1 - 135hp 1000cc V-twin three-wheeler

March 18, 2006 ADDITIONAL IMAGES For those who have looked enviously at three wheeled prototypes such as the Volkswagen’s GX3, Heikki Naulapaa's Aprilia Magnet, Tommy Forsgren's Hermes, Elisha Wetherhorn's Rider, Mercedes-Benz Life-Jet , Peugeot’s 20CUP, Toyota’s I-Swing, Dimitrios Scoutas' Skipee and the Phiaro Eternity, here’s one you can buy and use on the road. Powered by 1000cc of liquid-cooled DOHC, eight-valve, V-twin Suzuki motorcycle engine producing 135hp (98.6 kW) and 105 Nm of torque driving through a six-speed sequential gearbox, the SUB G1 three-wheeler weighs just 330kg, giving it Formula car power-to-weight, handling and aerodynamics. Set up by ex-GM automotive designers Niki Smart, Jay Brett and Nick Mynott, SUB is a small company in southern California that caters to clients who want individual specialised vehicles. Initial production preparations for the SUB G1 are underway and will be limited to a maximum of 25 units, with a minimum of 15 to start production. Cost of each vehicle will be US$80,000 with a US$25,000 security deposit. Read More
— Urban Transport

Freeline Skates – one two-wheeled skateboard for each foot

March 12, 2006 Since man invented the wheel, the promise of personal transport has been within reach for anyone with a vivid imagination and a healthy dose of engenuity. Ice skaters wishing to skate all year round made the first recorded wheeled shoes around 300 years ago, and the first patent for a roller skate was issued in France in 1819. The roller skate achieved mass popularity across Europe and the United States a century ago, with hundreds of skating rinks attracting the young-at-heart. But the availability of advanced plastics in the sixties really opened up the realms of personal transport as successive waves of roller skating, inline skating (the invention of the RollerBlade) and skateboarding captured the imagination of the youth of the day, creating sub-cultures, efficient personal transport and extreme athletes capable of performing tricks that seemingly defy Newtonian physics. With advanced materials now readily available for the fabrication of even the wildest ideas, new concepts for skating on tarmac keep coming and the latest such promising technology is Freeline Skates – one tiny, aluminium body, two-wheeled skateboard for each foot, ridden with a sideways stance like a skateboard and capable of being powered on the flat or even uphill by a body twisting motion. Very fast, very unique, very cool! Read More
— Urban Transport

Mercedes-Benz presents the Automatic Bike 2006

March 1, 2006 The name Mercedes Benz is synonymous with automobiles but it should be noted that the marque is also at the forefront of bicycle development. Twelve months ago Mercedes launched an automatic pushbike, and yesterday updated the 2006 Automatic Bike with a wealth of technical modifications and a much-enhanced sporty design. With a choice of two equipment lines, it brings a whole new dimension to muscle-powered movement at the same time as reducing the weight by a full four kilograms. Read More
— Urban Transport

The world’s first full size dual suspension folding bike

February 27, 2006 Innovative bicycle company Onyerbike has released a four bike range of foldable, full-size, dual-suspension bikes that finally offer high spec bikes you can tuck comfortably out of the way for ease of transportation or if you live in limited space or dorm/barracks accommodation. The top-of-the-range Hawk comes with adjustable suspension at both ends (lock out front suspension and air shock rear), magnesium wheels, a lightweight aircraft grade 7005 aluminium frame and Tektro disc brakes. The onyerbike range is unique in that it is the first to offer 26 inch wheels instead of the 20, 16 or 14 inch wheels which generally are used in folding bike solutions, so offering a genuine go-anywhere (on- or off-road) at-a-reasonable-clip bike. The company is seeking international dealers and distributors. Read More
— Urban Transport

Two-wheeled skateboard offers surfing on tarmac experience

January 1, 2006 The EssBoard is a skateboard with a twist – quite literally. Its two castor type wheels enable a motion that is very difficult to descibe, but enables the board to be propelled up-hill, and without needing to touch the ground, while at the same time enabling a motion that more closely captures the feel of surfing or snowboarding than any previous asphalt skateboard. Emanating from Korea, the EssBoard appears identical to “the Wave” board which comes from California, and the Exboard which comes from the UK, though we’ve been unable to ascertain which was the original or whether the designs originated independently. Putting originality aside, the Essboard (and presumably the Wave and exboard) offers some compelling functionality, as it works the torso and legs at the same time as offering captivating entertainment value. If you can’t quite comprehend what the Essboard, Exboard or Wave board can do, or how they work, check these videos at the Streetsurfing site, or these vidz at the Exboard site, or these at the Essboard site for beginners and expert riders. Read More
— Urban Transport

StreetSurfer offers a new two-wheeled experience

December 8, 2005 “The bicycle has effectively been the same since the safety bicycle evolved from the Penny farthing more than a century ago”, says Mark Palmer, chief evangelist of the StreetSurfer, “and we figured it was about time to take the next step.” Interestingly, those who have ridden the StreetSurfer tend to agree that it is not just very different to the bicycle, but significantly better in several key aspects – steering, cornering, front wheel tracking and the general feel which is more akin to surfing or snowboarding than a BMX or mountain bike – and more than capable of creating its own following and a dedicated street culture. The four-wheeled front foot of the StreetSurfer offers significantly more traction than a bike tyre and the dynamics of the bike are flowing like surfing. Suspension is equally unconventional, being comprised of polymers which activate on impact. Limited supplies will be available of the StreetSurfer prior to Christmas. Read More
— Urban Transport

The rear-view helmet

November 22, 2005 NEW IMAGES Seeing behind you on a motorcycle has always been a problem. Sometimes the mirrors vibrate, and sometimes they offer a terrific view of your elbows, and most of the time they offer a distinctly inferior view of the rear compared to that you get in a car because you can’t see the parts directly behind you. As a soldier in combat will tell you, when your situational awareness is down in a hostile environment, the risk of injury multiplies enormously. And hence when a helmet with an integrated rear view mirror system was launched last week in Munich we think it’s worth a look. Manufacturers Reevu spent ten years developing the helmet, which has a built-in 180 degree unbreakable rear-view mirror system in the hope it will save lives on the roads by improving situational awareness and hence preventing accidents. The innovative technology allows the wearer to see the road behind, using a system of unbreakable mirrors constructed out of ABS, which are contained inside the helmet shell and provide a window in the top of the helmet opening – a robust, low cost heads-up display. Read More
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