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The 787 Dreamliner used in the test

On Friday, Boeing completed the final certification test required by the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for approval of the company’s lithium-ion battery modifications for the 787 Dreamliner aircraft. The test flight was made using a Boeing-owned production airplane built for LOT Polish Airlines with the company reporting that the test was “straightforward and the flight was uneventful.”  Read More

Boston Dynamics' PETMAN stretches realistically to test the chemical protection suit

Back in late 2009 Boston Dynamics revealed it was working on a humanoid robot that would test protective clothing for the military. Having already amazed the world three years earlier with the lifelike balancing capabilities of its quadruped BigDog, this would be the company's first bipedal robot. It was an ambitious project, but it appears the work has paid off. The robot's eerily realistic body movements are made all the more convincing now that its mechanical nature is hidden by a chemical protection suit.  Read More

A prototype water heater system that uses cold water to make hot water pictured with Slate...

Apart from heating and cooling the house, water heating is one of the biggest energy drains in the average home. But what if you could literally use cold water to create hot water? That’s just what San Diego inventor Hal Slater claims to have done with the creation of a water heater system that promises to improve water heating efficiency by as much as 50 to 100 percent.  Read More

HondaVAC in action

If you’re like me and have kids and dogs, then a day out can leave the car looking as if the interior was marched through by a battalion of crisp-munching soldiers. To help deal with this everyday reality and eliminate the need to hunt down a hand vac, Honda has installed a built-in vacuum system into its 2014 Odyssey Touring Elite.  Read More

Scientists have been able to instantly cure rats of cocaine addiction, by applying laser l...

Like so many other illicit drugs, cocaine can be extremely, destructively addictive. Recent research suggests, however, that ridding people of such addictions may be as simple as zapping them on them scalp. In a study conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and at the Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center at UC San Francisco, scientists were able to turn cocaine addiction on and off in rats via pulses of laser light to their brains.  Read More

Though technically smart glasses, Epiphany Eyewear isn't nearly as smart as Google Glass

Are you pulling your hair out waiting for Google Glass to launch? One company has an alternative that you can pre-order right now. There is, however, a big catch. Actually, make that several big catches – as the device’s limitations might be too numerous for you to bother.  Read More

The Nutter is a cycling multi-tool that's combined with a tire lever

Cyclists just love their multi-tools. Unfortunately, given the emphasis that’s placed on keeping these tools small (and thus short), they usually provide very little leverage for tightening and loosening bolts. The Nutter addresses that problem by combining a multi-tool with something that most cyclists will be carrying with them anyway – a tire lever.  Read More

Fuel just might be the world smallest phone charger

Devotec Industries is launching a new product on Kickstarter that just might be the world's smallest emergency phone charging device. It's designed to be easily carried on a key ring, and everything needed to top up a phone is crammed inside a space smaller than the keys themselves.  Read More

The PayTango fingerprint-based identification and payment system

The uniqueness of a fingerprint has helped keep thumb drive files, computer systems and wallet contents safe from intruders for a good while now. Now, a team from Carnegie Mellon is breaking fingerprint recognition technology into new ground with the development of a secure payment system named PayTango, that uses a fingerprint scanner to identify shoppers and pay for items.  Read More

A 3D printer built at Oxford University can produce droplet networks capable of folding in...

While the prospect of 3D printers pumping out biological tissues and replacement organs has many justifiably excited, researchers at Oxford University have gone in a slightly different direction with the creation of a custom 3D printer capable of producing synthetic materials that have some of the properties of living tissues. Rather than being intended for supplying spare parts for damaged replicants, the new materials could be used for drug delivery or replacing or interfacing with damaged tissues inside the human body.  Read More

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