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The Quick Draw Clip System for personal organisation

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July 1, 2008

July 2, 2008 For most people, the mobile telephone is their principal business tool. It needs to be conveniently accessible wherever they are for optimum productivity. If you move beyond your desk regularly, that means carrying it with you without losing that accessibility. The Quick Draw Clip System offers an instant, accessible and secure way to carry cell phones, iPods, GPS, gloves, cameras, tools, keys, two-way radios or anything else you can come up with!

The Quick Draw system uses a small button that can be applied to any flat or round object and securely fastens to a plastic clip and can be easily released by pressing the top of the clip. This system makes it convenient to carry items right at your hip that can be quickly accessed and keep your hands free to do other things.

The system is simple and effective, and viewed from a slightly different angle, is probably more a personal organization method for personal belongings than a simple clip system – with mix and match clips and buttons of various styles from highly functional spring steel through to 18kt gold loops for your belt. It means that a camera can be kept close at hand while still having both hands free in the outdoors, just as easily as having your mobile phone at hand when you’re working or socializing. It’s a secure quick draw holster for anything you need regularly – there’s even a clip that holds your keys.

The belt isn’t the only place you can put things – there’s a beltless clip with a spring clip to attach it to almost anything – and with the buttons at $1.95, you can put one on every digital item you own for not much.

The entire catalogue is so cheap – the key clip is $2, the belt clip $8 and the top-of-the-line 18kt gold clip only runs to US$20 – that you could set yourself up entirely for not much more just to see if it would help run your life.

If there’s a drawback, it will be having all your most valuable items on display to the world around you. Though this might be okay in a work environment, we’d hasten to caution that this isn’t always a good idea in the wrong part of town, or a crowded public place.

There’s a camera clip made of spring steel construction which keeps your camera safe and within reach at all times. The camera clip comes with a threaded button, catalogue #396, for quick mounting. Any button will work with any clip! The system developed from an original camera clip made by inventor Terry Ward-Llewellyn.

Terry first made the clip in 1996 to carry cameras and it was made from powder coated spring steel. This clip was mostly used by photographers but was also used to carry cell phones. With the original clip’s success, Terry wanted to make a universal clip in a variety of colors that was light weight and very cost-effective and he has done exactly that!

The new clip comes in five new fun colors including black, translucent hot pink, clear, translucent electric blue, and the classic tortoise shell.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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