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Wine


— Around The Home

Sulfite-filtering Üllo aims to make wine-drinking less whine-inducing

By - July 22, 2015 5 Pictures

Do you get itchy, cramped-up or wheezy from even a little bit of wine? It could be because you have a sulfite sensitivity. Sulfites are sulfur-based compounds that are added in the wine-making process to prevent bacterial growth – they keep the wine from spoiling while it's in transit and storage. Given that they're not needed once the wine has been poured, however, chemist James Kornacki has developed a device for reducing them at that point in the game – it's called the Üllo.

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— Science

Engineered yeast could increase nutritional value of wine while reducing hangovers

By - March 18, 2015 1 Picture
Using a technique that cuts out unwanted copies of a genome to improve the beneficial properties of a compound, researchers working at the University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer, and Environmental Services (ACES) claim to have produced a yeast that could vastly increase the quality of wine while also reducing its hangover-inducing properties. Read More
— Robotics

VineRobot will keep tabs on the grapes

By - January 28, 2015 3 Pictures
While many of us may fantasize about running a vineyard someplace like the south of France, doing so wouldn't actually be all ... well, wine and roses. For one thing, you'd need to regularly walk up and down all those rows of vines, continuously stopping to check on the plants themselves and their grapes. It's the sort of thing that it would be nice if a robot could do. A robot like the VineRobot. Read More
— Medical

Resveratrol in red wine could help cut alcohol-related cancer risk

By - December 4, 2014 1 Picture
With the festive season upon us, many people will indulge in more alcohol than usual. The health risks of binge drinking (and embarrassing Christmas party behavior) aside, alcohol consumption is also a major risk factor for some cancers, including head, neck, esophageal, liver, breast and colorectal cancer. However, in a spot of good news, a recent study from the University of Colorado suggests that the chemical resveratrol found in grape skins and in red wine can help block the cancer-causing effects of alcohol. Read More
— Around The Home

Sonic Decanter: An (ultra)sound way to improve wine quality

By - November 25, 2014 11 Pictures
That bargain plonk ordinaire that passes as merely drinkable may soon get featured status at your next party. A startup out of Spokane, Washington, has unveiled its Sonic Decanter designed to improve the flavor, mouthfeel and aroma of wine in 20 minutes or less by using high frequency sound waves to break down preservatives, such as sulfur dioxide, transform the molecular and chemical structure of wine, and accelerate the aging process. Read More
— Good Thinking

The Miracle Machine turns water (and a few added ingredients) into wine

By - March 6, 2014 6 Pictures
A certain historical figure is reputed to have once turned water into wine, and whether you believe this event actually happened or not, the idea is a compelling one. Now, a wine expert and an entrepreneur claim that they have created a device that turns this concept into a reality. Just to ensure the connection is made, they have called the device the Miracle Machine. Read More

LED-equipped cork turns wine bottles into lamps

There's an old camping trick, for people who don't want to bother getting a lantern: just stick a flashlight up against the bottom of a plastic pop bottle, turn the flashlight on, then bask in the bottle's glow. Now you can do the same sort of thing with wine bottles, using suckUK's bottlelight. Read More
— Science

Tiny, cheap water-sensing chip outperforms larger, pricier sensors

By - October 18, 2013 2 Pictures
Whether you're growing wine grapes or mixing cement, there are some situations in which it's vitally important to monitor moisture content. Normally water sensors are used, although these can be both large and expensive. Now, however, a team from Cornell University has created a water-sensing silicon chip that's not only tiny, but is also reportedly "a hundred times more sensitive than current devices." What's more, the chips might be possible to mass-produce for just $5 a pop. Read More

Spin Chill turns beverages cold in 60 seconds

Since the earliest days of brewing beer and making wine, the search has been on for an easy, affordable method of chilling drinks quickly without diluting them in the process. Florida-based start-up Spin Chill claims to have a solution to this vexing problem with a portable device that (literally) turns beverages ice cold in 60 seconds. Read More
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