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Wi-Fi

— Science

Boeing replaces people with potatoes

By - December 21, 2012 3 Pictures
There doesn't seem to be anything you can’t do with potatoes. You can boil them, mash them, fry them, roast them and even make pens out of them. Boeing is taking this versatility a step further by using them to replace people. No, this isn't a strange genetic experiment. The plane maker’s engineers at the Boeing Test & Evaluation laboratories have discovered that sacks of potatoes work as a substitute for people, when testing the effect on WiFi of an airline cabin packed with passengers. Read More
— Computers

Intel demos WiGig wireless technology that is 10 times faster than 802.11n

By - September 16, 2012 1 Picture
Many home and business local area networks (LANs) built around the 802.11n standard are starting to buckle under the strain placed on them by an ever-increasing number of wireless devices clamoring for bandwidth. A new technology known as WiGig is looking to clear the bottleneck by offering transfer rates 10 times that of the fastest 802.11n networks. At its Intel Developer Forum (IDF) 2012 in San Francisco, Intel demonstrated WiGig multigigabit wireless docking technology that has the potential to remove almost all wires trailing to and from a computer. Read More
— Computers

Meet Ubi: An always-on, connected computer that talks back

By - August 15, 2012 5 Pictures
From HAL 9000 in Arthur C Clarke's Space Odyssey science fiction saga to Eddie and Deep Thought from the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, or even Dr. Theopolis from Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, voice interaction with computers was very much the stuff of science fiction when I was growing up. These days, of course, I can use my voice to tell an iPod touch to change music or get convincingly beaten in a TV game show by IBM's Watson but when shopping for a new computer, available options still depend on physical touch for input and visuals for output. The folks behind the ubiquitous computer (or Ubi for short) are hoping to change that by launching an affordable, unobtrusive and useful little box that's always ready and waiting to tell you what you need to know. Read More
— Music

New XDJ-AERO system offers DJs cable-free mobile device integration

By - August 12, 2012 4 Pictures
The term disc-jockey is thought to have first been coined in the mid-1930s to introduce a radio show host who played recorded (rather than live) music. Although 12-inch platters of grooved black goodness remain popular with Club and Party DJs, it's rare to find a radio professional who hasn't abandoned the format in favor of digital music. Mix-masters who have gone digital can also groove on the move thanks to powerful apps for smartphones and tablets like IK Multimedia's DJ Rig, but physical connectivity is still needed when adding device-based audio tracks to the set. Pioneer's Professional Sound and Visual Division has rallied to the cause with what's claimed to be the industry's first Wi-Fi DJ system capable of wireless playback from portable devices ... the XDJ-AERO. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Fuji F800EXR lets you share photos with iOS and Android devices

By - July 27, 2012 3 Pictures
Cameras which make it easy to share photos via WiFi are nothing new. Kodak started the ball rolling back in 2005, and most recently we've seen the NX Series from Samsung and the Nikon D3200 consumer DSLR get in on the action. Fujifilm, however, is taking a slightly different approach with the launch of the new FinePix F800EXR - it shares images with iOS and Android phones or tablets via an app. Read More
— Automotive

GM working on Wi-Fi Direct-equipped cars to detect pedestrians and cyclists

By - July 27, 2012 1 Picture
General Motors is working to expand upon its vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) and vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication systems that are being developed to allow information to be shared between vehicles and infrastructure to provide advance warning of potential road hazards, such as stalled vehicles, slippery roads, road works, intersections, stop signs and the like. The automaker is now looking to add pedestrians and cyclists to the mix so a car can detect them in low visibility conditions before the driver does. Read More

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