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Wheel


— Bicycles

SPEEDrelease bike hub combines advantages of quick-release and thru-axle

For the past several decades, higher-end bicycles have utilized quick-release axles in their wheel hubs, in order to facilitate fast and easy wheel removal. With the recent movement towards disc brakes on mountain bikes, however, some manufacturers have started using a more rigid, secure thru-axle setup. Given that discs should soon be showing up on more and more road bikes, Connecticut-based Topolino Technology recently unveiled its SPEEDrelease hub, which reportedly combines the best features of both systems in one lightweight design. Read More
— Good Thinking

Roadless wheel concept adjusts to all terrains

Graduate student Ackeem Ngwenya has combined the 6000 year-old wheel with modern materials to develop a new type of all-terrain wheel assembly that switches from narrow to wide tread at the turn of a screw. His Roadless wheel system, while envisioned for rural applications in his native Malawi, has the potential to be as big a change to road (and off-road) transport as was the introduction of anti-lock braking. Read More
— Bicycles

Loopwheels put a spring in your cycling

When you have plenty of bicycle to work with, such as is the case with a mountain bike, it’s not such a big deal to design it with front and rear suspension. When the bicycle in question is a diminutive folding city bike, however, it gets a bit trickier. That’s why UK industrial designer Sam Pearce has created Loopwheels. Instead of relying on a suspension fork and rear shock, it lets the bike’s 20-inch wheels absorb the bumps. Read More
— Bicycles

HubDock makes it easier to remove a bike's back wheel

Probably just about all cyclists will agree – removing your bike’s rear wheel is a hassle. You have to open and loosen off the quick-release, pull the derailleur cage and chain back out of the way, smack the axle loose of the dropouts, and then guide the cassette cogs around the now-dangling chain. Your hands get dirty in the process, plus you get to look forward to repeating everything in reverse when putting the wheel back on. California-based inventor Leonard Ashman figured that the process ought to be easier, so he created the HubDock – it lets you remove your back wheel, without even touching the drivetrain. Read More
— Sports

ARIS Sport throws a new curve at skateboard wheels

The ability to carve into turns is something that is valued by surfers, snowboarders and skateboarders alike. While water and snow are relatively easy to carve into, however, concrete and asphalt are most definitely not, putting skateboards at a bit of a disadvantage. Attempts have been made at better-carving skateboards, including the pivoting-truck-equipped BMW StreetCarver, the many-wheeled Freebord, the caster-wheeled T-Board, and the twisting Ripstick and Skatecycle. Now, San Francisco-based ARIS Sport has addressed the issue with a novel solution – a line of skateboards with conical wheels. Read More
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