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The High Roller observation wheel in Las Vegas is the world's tallest

Visitors to Las Vegas now have a new way to take in the famous Las Vegas Strip with the official opening of the world's tallest observation wheel on Monday. Standing 550 feet (167.6 m) tall, the aptly named High Roller is 9 ft (2.7 m) taller than the previous record holder, the 541-ft (164.8 m) tall Singapore Flyer.  Read More

The In Orbit exhibition is open until April 5 (Photo: Pierogi Gallery)

If you've ever felt your daily routine was like being stuck on a hamster wheel, then spare a thought for architectural artists Ward Shelley and Alex Schweder. The pair actually did live in a "home" shaped like an oversized hamster wheel for some 10 days as part of their art exhibit, dubbed In Orbit.  Read More

The SPEEDrelease hub works with regular dropouts, equipped with an adapter

For the past several decades, higher-end bicycles have utilized quick-release axles in their wheel hubs, in order to facilitate fast and easy wheel removal. With the recent movement towards disc brakes on mountain bikes, however, some manufacturers have started using a more rigid, secure thru-axle setup. Given that discs should soon be showing up on more and more road bikes, Connecticut-based Topolino Technology recently unveiled its SPEEDrelease hub, which reportedly combines the best features of both systems in one lightweight design.  Read More

The Copenhagen Wheel turns any bike electric

Back in 2009, MIT's SENSEable City team unveiled its Copenhagen Wheel prototype. In a nutshell, it's a self-contained electrically-powered rear bicycle wheel that can be installed on any regular bike, instantly turning it into an e-bike. Today, it was announced that a commercial version of the Copenhagen Wheel is now available to consumers.  Read More

FlyKly's Smart Wheel makes pedaling a bicycle easier

Electric bicycle wheels are coming to the masses, and they are coming from multiple sources. A few years ago we saw the Copenhagen Wheel, and now a similar product is making its way to market – the FlyKly Smart Wheel.  Read More

Design Engineer Ackeem Ngwenya contemplating  the internal structure of his Roadless varia...

Graduate student Ackeem Ngwenya has combined the 6000 year-old wheel with modern materials to develop a new type of all-terrain wheel assembly that switches from narrow to wide tread at the turn of a screw. His Roadless wheel system, while envisioned for rural applications in his native Malawi, has the potential to be as big a change to road (and off-road) transport as was the introduction of anti-lock braking.  Read More

The Shark Wheel literally reinvents the skateboard wheel

A company called Shark Wheel is aiming to reinvent, well, the wheel. Instead of the conventional circular shape we're all familiar with, this new skateboard wheel is based around a cube shape. While this might seem illogical, the company claims its new wheels ride smoother, faster, and offer better grip than traditional skateboard wheels.  Read More

Instead of spokes, the Loopwheel uses three looped carbon composite springs that run from ...

When you have plenty of bicycle to work with, such as is the case with a mountain bike, it’s not such a big deal to design it with front and rear suspension. When the bicycle in question is a diminutive folding city bike, however, it gets a bit trickier. That’s why UK industrial designer Sam Pearce has created Loopwheels. Instead of relying on a suspension fork and rear shock, it lets the bike’s 20-inch wheels absorb the bumps.  Read More

The wheel size is reduced from 24 inches in diameter, to 32 x 12.5 inches when folded

Getting from A to B in a wheelchair is enough of a challenge in itself, without considering the hassle of stowing the chair away each time its user wishes to travel by car, plane, or train. The Morph Wheel aims to make life a little easier in this regard, by providing a wheelchair wheel which folds into almost half its original size.  Read More

The HubDock allows cyclists to remove a bicycle's rear wheel without touching the chain or...

Probably just about all cyclists will agree – removing your bike’s rear wheel is a hassle. You have to open and loosen off the quick-release, pull the derailleur cage and chain back out of the way, smack the axle loose of the dropouts, and then guide the cassette cogs around the now-dangling chain. Your hands get dirty in the process, plus you get to look forward to repeating everything in reverse when putting the wheel back on. California-based inventor Leonard Ashman figured that the process ought to be easier, so he created the HubDock – it lets you remove your back wheel, without even touching the drivetrain.  Read More

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