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Wearable

Wearable technology is popping up in more and more areas of life — and that includes the ski slopes. The RideOn AR snow goggles have just appeared on Indiegogo, offering skiers and snowboarders a view of the mountain augmented with digital overlays. Don one of these headsets and you can get directions, messages, weather reports, virtual gates and more projected right in front of your eyes. Read More
Tactile feedback is nothing new. It's been used in telecommunications and in entertainment for decades, and it became a standard feature in the late 1990s in mobile phones and video games – where vibrations alert you to new messages or help you "feel" the forces exerted on your avatar. Haptic technology has been very much a bit player in the fields that it's infiltrated, though, and only now are we seeing it begin to take its place alongside visual and audio tech as a key element in human-computer interaction. Read More
For anyone who uses a car, collisions are an ever-present danger – that's why vehicles are equipped with safety features such as airbags. For senior citizens, however, simply falling down can also result in life-changing injuries. With that in mind, Pennsylvania-based company ActiveProtective is developing a wearable airbag that deploys in the event of a fall, to protect seniors' hip bones. Read More
Though some have described the Avegant Glyph as a virtual reality headset, we think that's way off the mark. And having demoed the Oculus Rift just a few hours before test-driving the Glyph, we can attest that the two are completely different products. Read on, for Gizmag's second pre-release look at Avegant's portable movie theater. Read More
Concussions – or at least concussion discussions – are all the rage lately, particularly in relation to professional sports leagues like the NFL. BlackBox Biometrics is adding to the discussion with a small, lightweight sensor designed to track concussive forces. Derived from the company's military blast force sensor, the consumer-grade Linx IAS straps to the head via a beanie or headband and measures impacts, providing an easy-read analysis that can help athletes identify concussions. Read More
After spending a week walking the showroom floors of CES, a wearable claiming to change your mood is probably going to activate your BS sensors. But today our demo of the Thync wearable was the rare CES meeting that's everything it's pretending to be – possibly more. Your neighborhood drug dealer might want to start looking for a new line of work. Read More
When you visit with enough companies at CES, you start to develop a sixth sense. All of them are ambitious, and some have promising – or even very good – products. But when something is really special, you can just tell. Oculus VR is one of those companies. We're hardly the first to say this, but the Oculus Rift is the future – and, with all due respect, none of the other companies trying to hop aboard the VR gravy train are anywhere close. Read More
Epitomical's Spur Atomic smartwatch takes a play out of the Neptune Pine's (or Dick Tracy's) book by squeezing a smartphone into something that'll fit comfortably on your wrist. Its sporty, curved look contrasts from the bulkier and rectangular Pine, yet the Atomic still manages to provide Android 4.2 alongside a solid set of specs that put it on par with low- to mid-range smartphones. Read More
Extreme sports sprang from small groups of rebellious, adrenaline-fueled athletes exploring uncharted territory, much like the Z-Boys taking their skateboards to the drought-stricken pools of California in the 1970s. These days there is a whole lot more on the line, with career-making endorsements hinging on perfect 720 degree spins and butter-smooth landings. On show at CES this week, the XsensrAIR sensor is aimed at extreme sports enthusiasts looking to take their craft to the next level, offering feedback on their performance in real time. Read More
If you want the functionality of a smartwatch, but don't want to give up your old wrist timepiece, you can always settle for an add-on module or a smartband, but they don't offer much for the haute horlogerie market – until now. The TimeWalker Urban Speed e-Strap series by Montblanc bills itself as the "first luxury brand to combine wearable technology with fine watchmaking." Read More
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