Highlights from the 2015 Geneva Motor Show

Wearable

The TactPuck is intended to offer a variety of sensory experiences, including vibration, i...

Hoping to bring back a bit of the personal touch to today's cold, impersonal digital communications, New Jersey-based startup Tactonics thinks the world might just get hooked on Tact messaging. With about the same effort it takes to send an emotionless, poorly spelled text message, you could send your loved ones a more heartfelt, meaningful "sensory message" that is intended to let them get in touch with your feelings.  Read More

In this rendering, the i Gel protects someone falling off a building by pushing him into a...

Last week's Wearable Technologies Conference in Munich showcased the future of cutting edge wearable design. While much of the exhibitor area was dedicated to usual suspects like performance-tracking sensors and wearable cameras, there was one design that immediately stood out. Still just a rough concept in need of partners, the i Gel protective system proposes a full-body airbag suit for protecting motorcyclists, bikers, skiers, and other hobbyists and professionals.  Read More

The QindredCam, pictured here in its prototype form, uses an array of sensors to decided w...

Acumulus9 aims to improve upon the existing lifelogging camera experience by not taking photos at predetermined intervals, but having its QindredCam select when and where to take a snap. It offers Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity and incorporates cloud storage to make it easy for users to view and share content.  Read More

Gizmag reviews the Fitbit Charge HR fitness tracker (Photo: Gizmag/Simon Crisp)

The new Fitbit Charge HR has got a lot of competition in the increasingly crowded fitness tracker market. With countless devices vying for the chance to monitor your activity and tell you you're not doing enough exercise, can the Charge HR stand out with its built-in heart rate monitoring, activity tracking, and gentle encouragement? We've recently spent a couple of weeks with one to discover whether it can encourage us to be more active.  Read More

Gizmag fires up some of the wackiest, most niche or not-ready-for-primetime wearables we r...

The wearables trend was on full display at CES 2015 in Las Vegas earlier this month, where we spotted lots of new wearables, including many that we'd be shocked to ever see in the wild.  Read More

Apple today announced that it's targeting an April ship date for the long-anticipated Appl...

When Apple announced its Apple Watch last September, all we knew about its release date is that it would be "early 2015." Today CEO Tim Cook snuck a more specific nugget of info into its Q1 earnings call: the company expects Apple Watch shipments to start in April.  Read More

The NHL is promising 'never-before-seen perspectives of the game' in its use of the GoPro ...

As wearable cameras get smaller, lighter and more powerful, so their potential increases, and the new deal that GoPro has inked with the National Hockey League is proof of that. Some of the players in last weekend's 2015 All-Stars Skills Competition and 2015 Honda NHL All-Star Game were kitted out with head-mounted GoPro cameras to capture all the action as it happened and give viewers a unique angle on the play.  Read More

The Gear S still isn't perfect, but it's the only smartwatch that could have fit our purpo...

As Samsung's sixth smartwatch in the span of a year, the Gear S was almost easy to dismiss. But after using one all through the insane week known as CES, we think it might be one of the more underrated tech products you can buy today.  Read More

The RideOn goggles bring augmented reality to the ski slopes.

Wearable technology is popping up in more and more areas of life — and that includes the ski slopes. The RideOn AR snow goggles have just appeared on Indiegogo, offering skiers and snowboarders a view of the mountain augmented with digital overlays. Don one of these headsets and you can get directions, messages, weather reports, virtual gates and more projected right in front of your eyes.  Read More

The next frontier in human-computer interaction will be all about making you feel the virt...

Tactile feedback is nothing new. It's been used in telecommunications and in entertainment for decades, and it became a standard feature in the late 1990s in mobile phones and video games – where vibrations alert you to new messages or help you "feel" the forces exerted on your avatar. Haptic technology has been very much a bit player in the fields that it's infiltrated, though, and only now are we seeing it begin to take its place alongside visual and audio tech as a key element in human-computer interaction.  Read More

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