Advertisement
more top stories »

Water


— Around The Home

Aqua Zinger bottle blends water to your taste

By - September 4, 2012 4 Pictures
We're constantly told to drink more liquids, with water especially recommended for re-hydrating thanks to its lack of any additives or diuretic qualities. But pure water, even the best mineral water money can buy, can be boring to drink all the time. Beverage manufacturers are aware of this with "flavored water" appearing on the shelves next to the regular stuff in recent times. The Aqua Zinger water bottle however, takes a DIY approach to spicing up your liquid intake by means of an attachable food blender. Read More
— Good Thinking

How to build a miniature Norwegian whitewater river

By - August 29, 2012 19 Pictures
When an architect is designing a building, they build a scale model to check how their design will work as an actual physical structure. What happens, however, when engineers are designing things that will have to be compatible with the currents in rivers ... things like dams, bridges, or pump stations? Well, that’s where water resources engineering firms like Northwest Hydraulic Consultants (NHC) come into the picture. Their work often includes building exact miniature recreations of waterways, complete with flowing water. We recently caught up with NHC principal Darren Shepherd, who guided us through the production process of one of his more exciting models – a one-twelfth scale Norwegian whitewater kayaking park. Read More
— Environment

Edible dispersant could provide more eco-friendly way to fight oil spills

By - August 23, 2012
Some people believe that there’s no problem that peanut butter, chocolate and whipped cream can’t solve. These people could be onto something with news that a team of researchers has developed a new, safer oil dispersant that uses edible ingredients found in the aforementioned trio of treats. The new dispersant could save the lives of thousands of birds and animals caught in environmental catastrophes. Read More
— Good Thinking

TOHL: the startup that lays water pipelines by helicopter

By - August 22, 2012 5 Pictures
A new startup named TOHL, comprised of a handful young Georgia Tech graduates, has set up shop in Chile in an effort to "change the way people think about pipelines." Using little more than a helicopter and a coil of flexible high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe, TOHL laid a kilometer (0.6 miles) of water pipeline by helicopter in a "record-setting" nine minutes, despite windy conditions and mountainous terrain. TOHL claims this is "the first ever completely aerial installation of a pipeline." Now company President Benjamin Cohen is taking to Kickstarter to ask for US$30,000 to build the company's first "full-scale" installation. Read More
— Good Thinking

New system saves time and money in locating leaks in water pipes

By - August 6, 2012
Tracking down the source of a leak in water pipes can be a tricky business. Current techniques rely on acoustic sensing with microphones often used to identify noise resulting from pressurized water escaping the pipe. In plastic pipes in particular, that noise can fall away quickly, making leak detection difficult and time consuming. Researchers at the University of Sheffield claim to have developed a much more accurate system that locates leaks by sending a pressure wave along the pipe that sends back a signal if it passes any anomalies in the pipe’s surface. Read More
— Good Thinking

Solar Bag purifies water while you walk

By - August 1, 2012 7 Pictures
Lack of access to clean water causes the deaths of millions of people worldwide and in regions such as sub-Saharan Africa, clean water can be several days walk away. Producing a simple and cheap method of purifying water which doesn’t rely on first-world amenities such as a steady electricity supply, or batteries, has proven a significant challenge thus far, but a new prototype device created by Ryan Lynch and Marcus Triest offers hope of doing just this, for an estimated cost of around US$5. Read More
— Around The Home

BYPASSER is the faucet system Goldilocks might choose

By - July 20, 2012
What do you do when you want hot or cold water from the faucet? You set the temperature, turn the tap on, then wait for the water to reach the desired temperature before using any. Chances are, though, you simply let that initial not-hot-or-cold-enough water go down the drain. The new BYPASSER system from Belgium’s W&E Savings has been designed to keep that water from being wasted. Read More
— Environment

GE’s AquaSel cleans more water with less energy and money

By - July 18, 2012
Although water is the world’s most precious commodity, an astounding amount of it is wasted by industries. Fortunately, water treatment and recovery has become the focus of several technology companies, including GE, which recently demonstrated a water treatment technology that virtually eliminates losses at bottling plants and other water-related operations. The pilot study of GE’s AquaSel, a non-thermal brine concentrator technology, took place at the plant of a leading beverage company in Asia. GE says costs were greatly reduced and there was almost no liquid discharge. Read More
— Sports

Redesigned Speedo racing swimsuit ready for 2012 London Olympics

By - July 9, 2012 4 Pictures
A controversy during the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics was Speedo's introduction of its drag reducing LZR Racer swimming outfit. The suit worked so well that it was subsequently outlawed by the Fédération Internationale de Natation (FINA) as the technological equivalent of doping - it gave too large an advantage. Now, with the help of ANSYS simulation software, and just in time for the 2012 London Summer Olympics, Speedo has introduced the Fastskin3 racing system, which offers a new and apparently legal approach to drag reduction during competitive swimming. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement