Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

Visualization

The markerless AR system from Cimagine Media

When you want to augment a digital image creation onto the real world, you'll likely need to point your smart device's camera at the kind of markers found in Sony's TV Size Guide tool or on the front cover of magazines like Esquire. IKEA took this idea a step further by making its 2014 catalog the marker, but a new system from Israel's Cimagine Media uses a tablet or smartphone camera and sensors to position the virtual object in a room without the need for physical markers.  Read More

The Notch module in place on a shirt cuff (Photo: Notch)

Ever wanted to gauge how much power you can pack into a right hook? If you could wear a sensor network, capable of recording, replaying and analyzing how you moved, it would be a simple thing to figure out. That's what Stepan Boltalin set out to create with Notch, a sensor that you can attach to your clothes at specific points to capture your body's movement data in 3D.  Read More

In the CastAR system, glasses project light onto a retro-reflective screen to create a 3D ...

Imagine a multi-user augmented reality experience that feels natural and can scale to any size you want, without common pitfalls like dizziness or an expensive price tag. That's what hardware hacker Jeri Ellsworth and her team at Technical Illusions are shooting for with CastAR. Gizmag snatched a chance to play with the system at World Maker Faire 2013, where it won the Editor’s Choice and Educator’s Choice awards.  Read More

Simulated silk crepe de chine, linen plain, silk shot fabric, velvet and polyester satin c...

Computer scientists have come up with a new simple, accurate way to simulate the appearance of fabric that could change the way artists and animators in the film and computer game industries go about the business of rendering computer-generated clothing and other materials.  Read More

Disney's algorithm at work

Disney Research has developed an algorithm which can generate 3D computer models from 2D images in great detail, sufficient, it says, to meet the needs of video game and film makers. The technology requires multiple images to capture the scene from a variety of vantage points.  Read More

A MacBook's electromagnetic field brought to life (Video still: Luke Sturgeon and Shamik R...

By rigging an Android smartphone as an electromagnetic field indicator, interaction designers Luke Sturgeon and Shamik Ray have visualized the fields around everyday electronics using long-exposure photography and stop-motion animation. The results are fascinating and beautiful.  Read More

The quick body movements of sparring martial artists are tracked by The Captury's software...

Actors may soon say good-bye to those humbling Lycra body suits commonly used in the visual effects industry, thanks to a group of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Informatics (MPII). They've formed a start-up called The Captury that is set to deliver its proprietary markerless motion capture software later this year. Their software can even capture a costume's surface detail in three dimensions, like the draping folds in a ballroom dress.  Read More

Game of Thrones' King's Landing, Minecraft-style (Image: WesterosCraft)

A dedicated band of Minecraft and Game of Thrones enthusiasts has lovingly recreated the fictional King's Landing locale in incredible detail. The setting will be familiar to fans of George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire fantasy novels and its TV adaptation, Game of Thrones, as the capital of the Seven Kingdoms.  Read More

The Reality Deck at SBU boasts 416 high resolution screens

If you’re impressed by the 4K TVs set to hit the market from the likes of Sony, Toshiba and LG, then get an eyeful of the new Reality Deck officially opened at New York’s Stony Brook University (SBU) last week. Described by its creator as the closest thing in the world to Star Trek’s holodeck, the four walls of the Reality Deck are covered in a total of 416 high resolution screens that provide a total resolution of 1.5 billion pixels. SBU says this makes it the largest resolution immersive display ever built driven by a graphic supercomputer.  Read More

The proposed interactive shop window differs from existing touchscreen technology by using...

Window shopping of the future will be exactly that, with consumers able to make purchases from in front of the store, even after hours. Using 3D imaging technology, researchers in Germany are developing a system capable of recognizing facial gestures and hand position, so that shoppers can control a digital shop window display. The system allows for transactions, and can collect data on shopper trends without collecting personal data such as facial recognition. For those germ-conscious shopaholics who think public touchscreens are a conduit for nasties, this is the interactive shop window for you.  Read More

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