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Vision


— Health and Wellbeing

Spot brings long-overdue update to vision screening

By - February 27, 2012 2 Pictures
For the past 150 years, ophthalmologists have used the Snellen chart – with its rows of letters in descending sizes – to check patients’ vision. While it has done the job reasonably well, PediaVision CEO David Melnik believes that his Spot device offers some distinct advantages. Most importantly, instead of being required to read and recite letters, patients simply look into the device as it takes some pictures. Based on those images, it will proceed to notify clinicians if it detects potential vision problems. Read More

Goggles let you see the world upside down or reversed

Ever wondered what it would be like to see the world upside-down? And no, just turning your head upside-down doesn't work. Well, anyhow, these goggles allow you to do just that. If seeing the ground above and the sky below is just a little too out-there for you, though, they can also be adjusted to let you see everything right-side-up, but reversed. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Human embryonic stem cell transplants found to improve vision in clinical trials

By - January 24, 2012 1 Picture
UCLA researchers are reporting a milestone in the therapeutic use of stem cells after two legally blind patients who received transplants of specialized retinal cells derived from human embryonic stem cells reported a modest improvement in their vision. Monitoring of the patients’ progress over a four month period also found no safety concerns, signs of rejection or abnormal cell growth. The researchers are claiming that the success of the procedure could pave the way for a new therapy to treat eye diseases. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Childrens' vision-testing device could catch problems that others miss

By - January 20, 2012 1 Picture
According to figures reported by the University of Tennessee, even though 85 percent of a child’s learning is vision-related, about 80 percent of American children have never had their eyes tested before starting kindergarten. Even when tests are performed, they are usually only capable of detecting no more than a couple of conditions. Unfortunately, this means that vision-related learning disabilities such as dyslexia can be missed, and may not be noticed until they are well-established. Now, however, researchers at U Tennessee’s Space Institute have developed a new type of vision-testing system for young children, that could catch a variety of vision problems while they’re still reversible. Read More
— Aircraft

Vision-based system that imitates insects designed to improve navigation of UAVs

By - December 19, 2011 1 Picture
Along with the well known defense applications, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are also used for crop dusting, bushfire and environmental monitoring, and infrastructure inspection. Such applications can see them flying close to the ground and amongst obstacles meaning it is of the utmost importance for pilotless craft to be able to accurately determine their heading and orientation to the ground. By imitating the method insects employ, Australian researchers have designed a vision-based system to provide real-time guidance for these eyes in the skies. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Soon you could control your smartphone with your eyes

By - December 8, 2011 1 Picture
Could you one day control your smartphone by just looking at it? Tech company Senseye thinks so, and is developing the technology to do just that. The technology uses the forward-facing camera on your smartphone to locate your eyes and then estimate where you're looking on the screen. The computer-vision algorithms used are precise enough that your phone will be able to tell even what icon you're looking at, allowing you to open programs, or even control games. Read More
— Science

Prototype contact lens brings Terminator-esque vision a little closer

By - November 23, 2011 1 Picture
Fans of the original film in the Terminator franchise will recall how various bits of data were shown to be overlaid on the cyborg's vision - in particular, they might remember the list of possible responses that could be used when someone was angrily knocking on its door (for those who don't remember, its chosen response wasn't very polite). Such augmented vision systems are now a little closer to reality, thanks to work being done by a team of scientists at the University of Washington and Aalto University, in Finland. They have created a contact lens that displays information, which is visible to the wearer. Read More
— Science

Computer vision system recognizes 3D objects via heat diffusion

By - June 21, 2011 2 Pictures
When we see a hand, regardless of whether it's open, in a fist, or pointing a finger, we still recognize it as a hand. If a computer has only been taught to recognize an open hand, however, it will probably have no idea what a fisted hand is. Getting computer vision systems to interpret images more like people do - to realize that a fist is a hand, for instance - has been one of the aims of artificial intelligence researchers for some time now. Things in that field may be about to take a step forward, however, as scientists from Indiana's Purdue University have just announced two new methods of three-dimensional object recognition, both based around heat diffusion. Read More
— Mobile Technology

DanKam app clears up color blind confusion

By - January 4, 2011 2 Pictures
Best known for discovering security flaws in online systems, Dan Kaminsky has recently announced the development and release of a smartphone app to help with color blindness. DanKam takes the colors that cause viewing problems and applies filters to make them visible. The system is currently optimized for the most common form of color vision deficiency, although users are encouraged to customize and tweak the augmented reality app to try and find settings that work best for them. Read More
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