Photokina 2014 highlights

Vision

A robot hand developed by the University of Tokyo's Ishikawa Oku Lab is reportedly so adep...

A robot hand developed by the University of Tokyo's Ishikawa Oku Lab is reportedly so adept at the game rock, paper, scissors that it is unbeatable against a human opponent.  Read More

The Eyejusters adjustable glasses with the adjustment tool in place

Anyone who currently wears glasses or contact lenses will have likely consulted an optometrist to determine their prescription ... that is, if they live in the developed world. In developing nations, many people aren't afforded the opportunity to see a professional in this field. Thankfully there are alternatives, one of which are the self-adjustable glasses from Eyejusters.  Read More

Physicians at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have succeeded in growing human retinal ...

Among the primary causes of adult-onset blindness are degenerative diseases of the retina, such as macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. While some treatments have been developed that slow down the rate of degeneration, the clinical situation is still generally unsatisfactory. But if you could grow a new retina, transplant might be a possible cure. Now new hope is springing up from a research project at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in which scientists have succeeded in growing human retinal tissue from stem cells.  Read More

Spot is a new camera-like device for detecting vision problems

For the past 150 years, ophthalmologists have used the Snellen chart – with its rows of letters in descending sizes – to check patients’ vision. While it has done the job reasonably well, PediaVision CEO David Melnik believes that his Spot device offers some distinct advantages. Most importantly, instead of being required to read and recite letters, patients simply look into the device as it takes some pictures. Based on those images, it will proceed to notify clinicians if it detects potential vision problems.  Read More

Reversing Goggles allow you to see the world upside-down or reversed left-to-right

Ever wondered what it would be like to see the world upside-down? And no, just turning your head upside-down doesn't work. Well, anyhow, these goggles allow you to do just that. If seeing the ground above and the sky below is just a little too out-there for you, though, they can also be adjusted to let you see everything right-side-up, but reversed.  Read More

A clinical trial of the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis involving 30 patients has produced enc...

After receiving European market approval for its Argus II Retinal Prosthesis in 2011, Second Sight has published interim results of an international clinical trial showing encouraging results in blind patients suffering degenerative eye conditions that lead to incurable blindness.  Read More

UCLA's Dr. Steven Schwartz (center) transplanting specialized cells derived from human emb...

UCLA researchers are reporting a milestone in the therapeutic use of stem cells after two legally blind patients who received transplants of specialized retinal cells derived from human embryonic stem cells reported a modest improvement in their vision. Monitoring of the patients’ progress over a four month period also found no safety concerns, signs of rejection or abnormal cell growth. The researchers are claiming that the success of the procedure could pave the way for a new therapy to treat eye diseases.  Read More

Inventor Ying-Ling Ann Chen, with the DOES device

According to figures reported by the University of Tennessee, even though 85 percent of a child’s learning is vision-related, about 80 percent of American children have never had their eyes tested before starting kindergarten. Even when tests are performed, they are usually only capable of detecting no more than a couple of conditions. Unfortunately, this means that vision-related learning disabilities such as dyslexia can be missed, and may not be noticed until they are well-established. Now, however, researchers at U Tennessee’s Space Institute have developed a new type of vision-testing system for young children, that could catch a variety of vision problems while they’re still reversible.  Read More

Australian researchers have designed a vision-based system to provide real-time guidance f...

Along with the well known defense applications, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are also used for crop dusting, bushfire and environmental monitoring, and infrastructure inspection. Such applications can see them flying close to the ground and amongst obstacles meaning it is of the utmost importance for pilotless craft to be able to accurately determine their heading and orientation to the ground. By imitating the method insects employ, Australian researchers have designed a vision-based system to provide real-time guidance for these eyes in the skies.  Read More

Senseye's technology uses the forward-facing camera on your smartphone to locate your eyes...

Could you one day control your smartphone by just looking at it? Tech company Senseye thinks so, and is developing the technology to do just that. The technology uses the forward-facing camera on your smartphone to locate your eyes and then estimate where you're looking on the screen. The computer-vision algorithms used are precise enough that your phone will be able to tell even what icon you're looking at, allowing you to open programs, or even control games.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 28,593 articles