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Virtual Reality

— Wearable Electronics

Google Cardboard starts to bleed into consumer VR, with the XG VR

By - January 15, 2015 3 Pictures
Virtual reality headsets are becoming a lot like smartwatches: anyone and everyone who can possibly make one is trying to get a piece of the pie before they go mainstream. I Am Cardboard, one of the most popular assemblers of Google Cardboard headsets, is now asking for crowdfunding dollars to make a consumer-grade headset that builds on the foundations of Google's cheap developer kit. Read More
— Wearable Electronics Feature

One-on-one with Oculus VR and the "Crescent Bay" Oculus Rift

When you visit with enough companies at CES, you start to develop a sixth sense. All of them are ambitious, and some have promising – or even very good – products. But when something is really special, you can just tell. Oculus VR is one of those companies. We're hardly the first to say this, but the Oculus Rift is the future – and, with all due respect, none of the other companies trying to hop aboard the VR gravy train are anywhere close. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Samsung Gear VR vs. Oculus Rift DK2

By - January 1, 2015 19 Pictures
In our product comparisons, we line up consumer gear and do our best to help you make up your mind ... but this one is a little different. The Oculus Rift Development Kit 2 (DK2) isn't a consumer product, but there could be value in seeing how the Samsung Gear VR, a virtual reality headset that is a consumer product, measures up with it. Read on for Gizmag's features and specs comparison. Read More
— Wearable Electronics Feature

Bored with exercise machines? One day Oculus Rift could spice things up

VR headsets like the Oculus Rift and Gear VR are great for gaming and immersive 360-degree videos. But what about exercise? Though the idea isn't without its flaws, virtual reality could one day add an exciting new dimension to stationary workout machines. Gizmag chatted with a researcher in the field (and went for a mind-bending VR spin of our own) to investigate. Read More
— Good Thinking

SIMVIZ simulates visual impairments with see-through VR display

By - December 22, 2014 5 Pictures
It's hard to appreciate the feeling of living with a visual impairment if you haven't experienced it yourself. The edge blurring of glaucoma or the clouded, fogged-up vision of a cataract, or even the confusing hue-challenged sights of a colorblind person may register on an intellectual level with somebody who has normal vision, but few really "get it" because it's too alien to them. SIMVIZ aims to fix that by attaching a wide-angle camera to a virtual reality headset, to filter the world around you according to any of six visual impairments: colorblindness, glaucoma, cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, double vision, and macular degeneration. Read More
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