Advertisement
more top stories »

Video Cameras


— Digital Cameras

Red Rocket Travel Slider is for film-makers on the go

By - March 25, 2013 3 Pictures
Although not everyone may remember it, there was a time when if you wanted to make a professional-looking film, you needed either a 16mm movie camera or something along the lines of a BetaCam. Compact professional video cameras and video-capable DSLRs have changed that, although slick-looking videos still require more than just a good camera – it helps if you have a way of performing nice camera movements, too. The Red Rocket Slider is designed to get you some of those moves, without requiring a big gear truck or a big budget. Read More
— Digital Cameras

MojoFloCam has a funny name and a smooth purpose

By - March 22, 2013 4 Pictures
The skyrocketing popularity of smartphones and compact video cameras over the past several years has resulted in a certain class of products starting to show up a lot on Kickstarter – rigs for stabilizing video shot with the devices. We’ve recently covered models such as the Circle Thing, the Stabil-i Case, and the SteadeeGo. One of the latest such products, Steadibitz’ amazingly-named MojoFloCam, looks like it does a pretty good job at smoothing out the shakes. Read More
— Digital Cameras

The BallCam – coming soon to a gridiron near you?

By - February 27, 2013 1 Picture
Viewers of televised football games can now see footage from video cameras mounted on the players’ helmets and the coaches’ heads ... what else could one ask? Of course, let’s see what things look like from the ball’s point of view! Actually, that’s no longer as far-fetched as it once was. Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University and Japan’s University of Electro-Communications (UEC) recently unveiled their BallCam system, which can provide relatively smooth video from a spinning, airborne football. Read More
— Digital Cameras

SteadyWheel takes a circular approach to stabilizing video

By - February 20, 2013 5 Pictures
As can be seen by the increasing number of stabilizing rigs available for DSLRs and small camcorders, people don’t like shaky hand-held video. Most of those rigs are inspired by the Steadicam Smoothee, utilizing a counter-weighted arm that extends below the gimbal-mounted camera. It’s an effective set-up, but one that’s also kind of fiddly. Fabricator and machinist Robert Stone has created something much more simple, in the form of the SteadyWheel. Read More
— Digital Cameras

MeCam video camera is worn like a button or necklace

By - January 24, 2013 5 Pictures
People seem to be pretty content with using their smartphone video cameras to capture life’s zany moments, although constantly holding up one’s phone to follow the action can sometimes get a little tiring. That’s why the MeCam was invented. It’s a video camera that can be pinned to your shirt or worn on an included cord like a necklace, so you can shoot your clips without having to play Cameraman. Read More
— Digital Cameras

3rd Person View lets you star in your own action videos

By - January 21, 2013 9 Pictures
If you like to shoot point-of-view videos of your “extreme” endeavors, perhaps you sometimes get people saying “How come we never get to see you in any of these?”. Well, you can address that by using something like the BoomPro or Go360 – both devices suspend your camera from your helmet, allowing it to get a shot of you. Soon, however, you may be able to get something a bit fancier, in the form of the 3rd Person View. Read More
— Digital Cameras

ATC Chameleon actioncam gets two shots at once

By - November 12, 2012 3 Pictures
When you’re shooting first-person video of activities such as surfing, cycling or kayaking, it always helps spice up the finished product if you include footage from more than one perspective. Usually, the only way that can be accomplished is to use multiple cameras, or to stop and reposition the one camera. Oregon Scientific, however, is taking a different approach with its new ATC Chameleon actioncam. It records two perspectives at once, which it merges into a split-screen display. Read More
— Automotive

Optical camouflage turns car's back seat transparent

By - November 8, 2012 2 Pictures
When you turn around to look behind your car as you’re reversing, what do you see? If your car is like most, you see a bit of the road through the back window, with a whole lot of your back seat underneath. If only you could see through that seat, you could see so much more of the road. Well, a group from Japan’s Keio University has developed a system that lets drivers do that ... sort of. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement